ECHR: Defaming Prophet Muhammad Beyond “Permissible Limits” of “Objective Debate”

The European Court of Human Rights has ruled that defaming the Prophet Muhammad “goes beyond the permissible limits of an objective debate”, upholding an earlier conviction by an Austrian court on the grounds it “served the legitimate aim of preserving religious peace in Austria”.

The ECHR found that a 47-year-old woman from Vienna had not had her right to freedom of expression impinged and added that domestic courts had been correct to convict her for “disparaging religious doctrines” as her comments “could stir up prejudice and threaten religious peace”.

According to the ECHR, the woman held two seminars in 2009 “in which she discussed the marriage between the Prophet Muhammad and a six-year-old girl, Aisha, which allegedly was consummated when she was nine. Inter alia, the applicant stated that Muhammad ‘liked to do it with children’ and ‘… A 56-year-old and a six-year-old? … What do we call it, if it is not paedophilia?'”

The Austrian court found that “by making the statements the applicant had suggested that Muhammad was not a worthy subject of worship”. The ECHR has now agreed that this is a crime which trumps a person’s right to free speech. On the same day that Ireland is finally voting to take blasphemy laws out of its constitution, the ECHR seems determined to put them back in…

mdi-timer 26 October 2018 @ 11:12 26 Oct 2018 @ 11:12 mdi-twitter mdi-facebook mdi-whatsapp mdi-telegram mdi-linkedin mdi-email mdi-comment View Comments
Leavers Can Challenge £9 Million Leaflet In Euro Courts

banks elliot

The Venice Commission, of which the UK is a full member, was established by the Council of Europe to ensure European countries protect the “Principles of Europe’s electoral heritage”. Their Code of Good Practice in Electoral Matters has previously been used by the European Court of Human Rights to settle legal disputes – including challenging the ban on prisoner voting.

Millionaire Brexit backer Arron Banks and Vote Leave’s head Matthew Elliot should pay particular attention to paragraph 111 of the Code, which states the following:

“in the field of public funding of parties or campaigns the principle of equality of opportunity applies”

The referendum would here be defined as a “campaign”, which must achieve “equality of opportunity” when it comes to public funding. However, Leavers really have the government bang to rights with the later Code of Good Practice on Referendums. The 24 page document provides specific guidelines for European states looking to hold referendums, including very firm rules on public funding:

“the public authorities (national, regional and local) must not influence the outcome of the vote by excessive, one-sided campaigning. The use of public funds by the authorities for campaigning purposes must be prohibited.”

That’s section 3, subsection 3.1, paragraph b telling governments that the use of public funds must be specifically ruled out to ensure the “Freedom of voters to form an opinion”Banks and Elliot can take their case to the European Court of Human Rights here

mdi-timer 8 April 2016 @ 12:00 8 Apr 2016 @ 12:00 mdi-twitter mdi-facebook mdi-whatsapp mdi-telegram mdi-linkedin mdi-email mdi-comment View Comments