Andrew Neil Nails It On Churchill as BBC Announce End of This Week

This Week began with an opening monologue from Andrew Neil that set the record straight on Churchill after the nonsense spoken about him over the last few weeks. A timely refresher that all politicians should watch…

UPDATE: It emerged overnight that the BBC is scrapping This Week after 16 years with Andrew Neil stepping down from late night presenting. His weekly slot on Politics ‘Lite’ will soon be his only regular appearance – this hardly does justice to one of the giants of broadcasting. Neil is one of the few true heavyweights left on the BBC, they will miss him when he’s gone…

Fran Unsworth, BBC Director of News, said: “We couldn’t imagine This Week without the inimitable Andrew Neil, one of Britain’s best political interviewers. After 16 years, Andrew is bowing out of late-night presenting on the show, at the top of his game. We want to keep Andrew at the heart of the BBC’s political coverage. He continues to present Politics Live on Thursdays and we look forward to developing future projects with him.”

An “Institute for Public Interest News” is a Very Bad Idea

The Cairncross Review published yesterday recommends the creation of a news quango, the “Institute for Public Interest News”. Cairncross says it would work like the Arts Council, channeling public and private funding to “those parts of the industry it deemed most worthy of support”. It is a good analogy, the Arts Council takes taxpayers’ money and spends it on things most taxpayers don’t want, like opera. Public interest news is often something the public have little interest in.

The supposed problem is that local papers are going to the wall because advertising has dried up and shifted to Google and Facebook. This is apparently a threat to local democracy because local politics goes unreported. The Institute for Public Interest News would fund high quality public interest news. No doubt this will cost taxpayers hundreds of millions, though this was unspecified…

According to the report, the quango would be

“a dedicated body [which] could amplify efforts to ensure the future sustainability of public-interest news, working in partnership with news publishers and the online platforms, as well as bodies such as Nesta, Ofcom, the BBC and academic institutions.”

Hold on, don’t we already have a dedicated body, with billions in public funds, dedicated to public-interest news? It is called the BBC.

Why do we need another public body? Isn’t the BBC actually part of the reason independent local journalism is dying? The expansion of the BBC into local radio and covering local affairs online is killing off independent private sector journalism. The billions in revenue that the BBC has supports 46 local radio stations and the most visited news website in Britain, how can local newspapers compete with that? That the BBC has started funding a “Local Democracy Reporting Service” is an admission that it is part of the problem. The BBC’s lavish funding enables it to suck up the audience that otherwise would go to independent news sources, thus undermining their viability.

State mandated and funded “public interest news” is a dangerous idea, even if it didn’t degenerate into propaganda it is unlikely that it would ever bite the hand that feeds it. The state should stay out of the business of journalism.

BBC Should Make Billions Worldwide from iPlayer, Not Over-75s

If you started paying the TV licence fee in your student days and are now 75, you would – at today’s rates – have paid approximately £7,500 into the BBC’s coffers. After half-a-century of being forced to fund the likes of Gary Lineker’s multi-million pound fees, it seems not unreasonable that your retirement from working should coincide with getting him and all the other overpaid celebrities off your back. That is why the government exempted OAPs from facing jail for non-payment of the BBC’s regressive telly poll tax.

The BBC is lobbying hard for the government to pay the licence fees, claiming it is costing them hundreds of millions. This is not really a “cost”, it a loss of revenue. The BBC collects some £3.5 billion from the telly tax and £1.5 billion from commercial revenue. It greedily wants to get a few hundred million more from the over-75s. Here’s a suggestion, cut back on Lineker and the likes’ bloated pay packets and generate some more revenue from iPlayer worldwide.

If Netflix and Amazon can generate billions worldwide from online streaming, so can the BBC. There is no technological reason the BBC can’t do it. The reason they don’t do it is purely political. If iPlayer was a pay-as-you-go streaming service the rationale for the licence fee, such as it is, would be destroyed.

The BBC funding model is based on coercion, it is out of date. Netflix’s global success shows just how badly the BBC missed the opportunity to be a global streaming media company with the headstart it had with iPlayer. Now they want to make OAPs or younger taxpayers pay for their commercial mistakes…

What the Humphrys Saw

Guido understands that Nick Robinson decided that he was very interested in what was on his computer monitor rather than the studio guest during this morning’s interview with Dr Victoria Bateman. The eccentric naked Remainiac campaigner called on Jacob Rees-Mogg to debate her naked. Over to you Jacob…

UPDATE: We now have video…

KFC Trolls Theresa May

You know your negotiating skills aren’t much good when KFC take out a full-page newspaper advert trolling you. Although perhaps KFC shouldn’t be gloating too much given their own embarrassing logistical issues not too long ago…

Richard Burgon Wins £30,000 Damages in ‘Nazi Imagery’ Libel Case Against The Sun

Richard Burgon has won his libel case against The Sun for an article which claimed that his heavy metal band used “Nazi imagery”. A “delighted” Burgon has been awarded a healthy £30,000 in damages. Burgon says he will use it to fund a paid justice internship for a young person from Leeds…

The Sun have put out a statement saying they are “deeply disappointed” by the judgement and are planning to appeal:

Media Ignore New Production of World’s Best-Selling Car in UK

Nissan’s decision not to begin production of a new model of car in Sunderland dominated the media at the start of the week, despite no jobs actually being lost. Brexit naturally got all the blame, despite a large number of other significant factors including falling demand for diesel cars and the EU’s stringent new emissions standards in the wake of Germany’s major diesel fraud scandal. If it was really a Brexit issue why didn’t Nissan just move production to one of their many manufacturing plants in Spain, or France where they have a strategic partnership with Renault?

Funny how quiet the media was when another Japanese car giant did start a major new production line – just last month Toyota commenced production of the new 2019 Corolla at its Burnaston plant in Derbyshire where over 3000 people are employed. The Corolla is not a niche SUV like the Nissan X-Trail, it is the best-selling car model in the world…

In fact the only mention of the new Corolla on BBC News was a single line in an article puffing up the latest round of no-deal bluster from the firm’s European boss and Greg Clark, which didn’t even mention the fact that new production had started. Not a word from Project Fear cheerleaders Sky News…

Sky News Goes Raw

To celebrate their thirtieth birthday today, Sky News have launched a not-at-all-creepy initiative called Sky News Raw, where they broadcast the behind the scenes internals of their office. They’re broadcasting with Big Brother style commentary from 7am-5pm today. Not that Sky News hasn’t been raw before

Cambridge Analytica ‘Whistleblower’ Wylie Gets ‘Ethical’ New Data-Targeting Job

There was some surprising news from the world of fashion last week, with H&M announcing that they would be hiring Cambridge Analytica ‘whistleblower’ Chris Wylie to use data analytics and “sustainable and ethical” artificial intelligence to help them target potential customers. Guido thought he would do H&M the favour of reminding them about some of Wylie’s previous corporate engagements, to let them decide for themselves just how “ethical” they were…

Guido readers will be remember how Chris Wylie founded his own Cambridge Analytica spin-off, Eunoia Technologies, after acrimoniously parting ways with them. Eunoia then made failed pitches offering the same sort of illicit data targeting, to everyone from Britain Stronger in Europe to Donald Trump, until he finally found a client in Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party in Canada, trousering a handsome C$100,000. Despite telling Damian Collins he had no clients…

The gaping hole in the narrative of Wylie’s Damascene conversion from “evil” data genius to righteous moral hero is the four-year gap between Wylie leaving Cambridge Analytica and finally deciding to blow the whistle on them, in which time he was happily carrying on with the same activities himself. Surely it had nothing to do with saving his own skin with a highly aggressive journalist hunting him down?

Even Damian Collins found enough time between grandstanding and amplifying Carole’s columns to put Wylie on the spot over this when he questioned him last year. If Wylie felt so strongly about the wrongdoing, why did he wait so long to expose it?

Wylie’s answers to Collins were a veritable cocktail of lies and misinformation:

  • Wylie told Collins that he hadn’t blown the whistle sooner because he “didn’t appreciate the future impact” of his work at the time as well as claiming that he did “not think military-style information operations is conducive for any democratic process”.
  • This is a bare-faced lie: in 2013 Wylie explicitly said his goal was to create the “NSA’s wet dream” and openly admitted he wanted to profit out of using the data for “evil” as “evil pays more”:

Our goal is first to make it an extremely profitable company. Then we will cleanse our souls with other projects, like using the data for good rather than evil. But evil pays more.”

  • Wylie even told Collins that Donald Trump’s election had made it “click in [his] head” about the wider impact of what he was doing. Another shameless lie given his own company’s attempts to sell voter-targeting services to Trump’s campaign…

Wylie also tried to use the excuse that Cambridge Analytica had come after him with a “very aggressive team of lawyers” and forced him to sign an undertaking of confidentiality. This is a highly distorted account of what actually happened:

  • According to the independent report into Cambridge Analytica by Julian Malins QC, CA’s lawyers did write to Wylie and his company, Eunoia, “regarding suspected breaches of covenants on intellectual property, client solicitation, staff solicitation and non-competition”.
  • CA found out after one of their existing US political clients tipped them off that they had received a proposal from Eunoia “which purported to deliver exactly the same services as SCL [CA’s parent company]”.

So CA did come after Wylie with lawyers after he left – not to try to hush him up but because he had started his own company in direct competition with them. And was attempting to poach their existing clients using their own intellectual property…

  • Wylie was forced to settle the prospective action in 2015 “by providing very wide ranging written undertakings to SCL… that, in summary, he would not use SCL’s intellectual property and other commercial or confidential material (obtained whilst working with SCL) in the course of his own business enterprise.”
  • As the Malins Report notes, his own business flopped after this: “Wylie was not then and has not been subsequently successful in forming and running a business competing with SCL/CA. Eunoia fell dormant and was subsequently struck off the company register.” Good of H&M to give him another go…

Wylie’s story suddenly starts to look less like a tale of redemption and more like a story of revenge. Carole’s appearance gave him the perfect opportunity to stick the knife into his former employers who had forced him out of business. While simultaneously covering up his own fundamental role in the scandal:

  • Right at the outset, Wylie introduced Cambridge Analytica to Dr Aleksandr Kogan, the academic who developed the original Facebook data-harvesting app.
  • He then worked directly with Kogan to turn it into the app at the heart of the Cambridge Analytica scandal.
  • Wylie left Cambridge Analytica, took the illegally-obtained data with him, and launched his own company trying to steal their clients.
  • He unsuccessfully tried to pitch the same illicit voter-targeting services to a range of clients including Trump, Vote Leave and Britain Stronger in Europe.
  • His company flopped after Cambridge Analytica forced him to stop using the intellectual property he stole from them.
  • Years later he finally turned whistleblower after being relentlessly pursued by Carole Cadwalladr for months.
  • Now he goes round the world doing media interviews and giving speeches about how he exposed the wrongdoing – which would probably never have happened in the first place without his involvement – while getting the chance to wipe his slate clean with a plushy job in industry.

And he’s meant to be the good guy in all of this?

Climate Change Committee Chair Took £600,000 From Green Groups For His Private Business

Yesterday the Mail on Sunday sensationally revealed that ‘green’ businesses have funnelled more than £600,000 into Sancroft International, the private company of Climate Change Committee chair and Conservative peer John Selwyn Gummer, now Lord Deben. His powerful committee consistently argues that billions of pounds of taxpayers’ money should be handed out to big green businesses to help them develop green tech. It just so happens some of that money found its way back to him…

  • Windfarm and solar investor Temporis Capital paid Gummer’s company £50,000 in the last five years.
  • Electric car battery producer Johnson Matthey handed Gummer’s firm nearly £300,000 over five years, after which he personally urged the Government to speed up plans to make all new cars on Britain’s roads battery-powered;
  • Energy producer Drax, which gets £700 million a year in Government subsidies, paid Sancroft £15,500 while the Climate Change Committee was writing a report on its activities.

Gummer has never declared these payments made to his company, but insists that he has been fully compliant with disclosure rules.

Despite the scale of the scandal, numerous news organisations including the BBC have entirely failed to cover it so far. Guido hears that the usual cabal of eco-journalists at are steering clear of this story for fear of consequences from the well-connected Gummer….

Ofcom Investigating BCfm Socialist Conspiracy Theorist

Last month Ofcom announced that they have opened up an investigation into Bristol Community FM’s ‘Politics Show’ presented by Tony Gosling. Guido is surprised they took this long…

As well as being a socialist who campaigns for nationalisation of housing, Gosling spends a lot of his time writing supportive tweets for the Maduro regime, and as the ‘Social Justice Editor’ for a 9/11 ‘Truther’ forum which describes itself as a campaign to re-investigate who was behind the 9/11 attacks. Oh, and he used to work for the BBC..

A frequent contributor to Russia Today, his biography claims he has spent his career “exposing the secret power of the Bank for International Settlements and élite Bilderberg Conferences where the dark forces of corporations, media, banks and royalty conspire to accumulate wealth and power through extortion and war.” On his podcast, Gostling poses questions such as “Is there a case for Jewish ‘race’ being innocent?” and “What is Jewishness and what’s the phenomenon’s relation to ‘chosenness’.” He is followed by John McDonnell on Twitter…

Guido has seen the complaint that sparked the Ofcom investigation, which analysed the content in one two-hour show.

  • Suggested the Manchester bombing may have been carried out by the British secret services.
  • Interviewed Miko Peled, the man who called for Labour members to be able to ask: “Holocaust, yes or no?”
  • Suggested Putin’s driver dying in a car accident was a CIA plot to assassinate Putin.
  • Interviewed author Joseph Wages, who claimed the Illuminati use rituals to infiltrate and control governments and “bring about a globalist ‘New World Order’ agenda.”
  • Interviewed David Livingstone who claimed “Christian Zionists aim to bring on their antichrist messiah by causing horrors and mayhem predicted in the New Testament Book of Revelation”

BCfm programming is carried by the BBC every weekend. Why do they continue to broadcast this crank..?

Beth Rigby Confirmed as Sky News Pol-Ed

Congratulations to Beth who beat off a lot of competition for the plum job of Sky News pol-ed.

FT Complains That the Economy is Doing Too Well

The Financial Times has truly outdone itself with this unintentionally hilarious article from Economics Editor Chris Giles complaining that the British economy has actually been doing too well since the referendum. Which is an interesting position for supposedly the world’s leading financial newspaper to take…

Not content with just being mystified by the fact that people failed to do as they were told in the referendum, the FT is now bemused as to why the markets haven’t done as the FT wants either. Giles bemoans the fact that “relatively benign economics has emboldened politicians to harden their Brexit demands and refuse to compromise” and declares that “it is now too late for markets or the UK economy to exercise much discipline on Britain’s politics before the scheduled exit date of March 29”. Translation: it’s too late for a financial or economic crash to scare people into doing what the FT says they they should do…

Giles says that since the referendum “economic performance has been tolerable while the employment rate has reached record levels.” Which is a bit of an understatement given the UK is currently the fastest-growing European country in the G7 while Italy and Germany slide towards recession. Rather than complaining that Project Fear hasn’t come true – despite the FT’s best attempts to talk it up – maybe they should have a little quiet reflection on why they got their predictions so wrong instead…

Tom Watson’s Still Fighting Tony

A decade has passed and still Tom Watson is still fighting Tony, this time it is Tony the Tiger who promotes Kellogg’s Frosties because they’re “grrrrreat”. This morning he told a gathering of advertising industry executives that “this failed advertising executive* loves your industry… and the Labour Party wants to do everything we can to support your success.“ He then told them to “Get that monkey off our packs. Get cartoon characters off advertising for high sugar foods… if you don’t I promise you the next Labour government will.” Which doesn’t seem very supportive of advertising…

The Shadow DCMS minister also asked if political advertising needs to come under the Advertising Standards Authority’s regulatory umbrella. Guido has practical and philosophical problems with that, firstly the ASA is not a regulator, it is a politically driven trade group that has no statutory powers. Nor should it.

Secondly it is the job of the voters to choose between liars who want to be elected. The idea that there could be some apolitical body that decides what is true in politics is nonsense, that is why we have democracy. Could an advertising regulator rule on claims as to whether tax cuts or more government spending will boost the economy? That is a political choice, not a matter of absolute truth.

Thirdly, Labour’s attack line against the advertising industry is a wilful misunderstanding of the true nature of the obesity problem in the UK. Lifestyle choices are the cause, not advertising. Banning promotional characters will not in itself get people off their screens and sofas. Left-of-centre politicians around the world are antipathetic to advertising because instinctively they know it is the propaganda arm of capitalism, it enables and encourages consumer choice in a free society. Advertising informs consumers and enhances competition, it lubricates capitalism…

An attack on advertising is, in effect, an attack on free speech. While commercial free speech may not be valued as highly by some as other forms of free speech, it should, nevertheless, be defended as an important principle. The advertising industry needs to defend itself strongly, something that the ASA cuckoos will never do…

*Tom Watson remind the ad execs he was once a junior account manager at an advertising agency in London where they “operated on the margins of creativity and the seedy world of direct mail…I loved the absolute bullshit of it all .. that experience helped me greatly in my job as a politician.” No further questions m’lud.

EU Cornered as Backstop Sham Starts to Unravel

The EU’s long-running duplicity over the Irish border has finally come to a head this week with the Commission wrapping itself up in knots trying to maintain its spurious position on the backstop after Commission Spokesman Margaritas Schinas caused a major fuss on Tuesday by saying that the EU would force Ireland to erect a hard border in the event of no deal. Not going to happen.

Michel Barnier then let the cat out of the bag yesterday while trying to reverse the diplomatic damage, admitting that in the event of no deal “we will have to find an operational way of carrying out checks and controls without putting back in place a border”, going on to say that “my team have worked hard to study how controls can be made paperless or decentralised, which will be useful in all circumstances.” Thus blowing apart the entire fiction that the backstop is necessary to avoid a hard border…

The Telegraph’s James Crisp grilled Schinas on this very point today, who ended up so flustered by the question that he eventually snapped back: “write what you like”. The sham of needing the backstop to avoid a hard border is finally starting to unravel in Brussels. Time the sycophantic British media and political establishment woke up too…

Brittany Ferries Accuse BBC of ‘Nonsense’ Scaremongering

Brittany Ferries have moved to slap down Remainer scaremongering about international travel beyond March, and reassure passenmgers. The iconic ferry company accused the BBC of peddling “nonsense” and reassured potential passengers that they can book beyond March.

“The company would like to make clear that passengers can book crossings to France and Spain, and sail-and-stay holidays as normal. There is absolutely no truth in speculation that passengers are being advised not to book because all space has been allocated to freight.

The reality is that Brittany Ferries has added 19 crossings on three of its nine routes leaving the UK. The additional sailings create more space for freight, as requested by the DfT. As a consequence, there is now more choice for passengers rather than less.”

Maybe it’s time for the BBC to start listening to the experts?

Loss Making Buzzfeed Firing Another 250 Staff

It is becoming a start-the-year tradition for Buzzfeed to fire staff in January, they did so last year and last night the CEO Jonah Peretti emailed staff telling them he’s firing 250 of them next week:

Hello BuzzFeeders,

I’m writing with sad news: we are doing layoffs at BuzzFeed next week. We will be making a 15% overall reduction in headcount across the company. I’m sending this tonight because I wanted you to hear it from me directly instead of from the press.

Over the past few months, we’ve done extensive work examining the trends in our business and the evolving economics of the digital platforms. We’ve developed a good understanding of where we can consolidate our teams, focus in on the content that is working, and achieve the right cost structure to support our multi-revenue model. We are confident the changes we are making will put us on a firm foundation and allow us to invest and grow sustainably for years to come.

I’m so proud of what our team accomplished over the last year, including diversifying our revenue, and growing our business double digits. Unfortunately, revenue growth by itself isn’t enough to be successful in the long run. The restructuring we are undertaking will reduce our costs and improve our operating model so we can thrive and control our own destiny, without ever needing to raise funding again. These changes will allow us to be the clear winner in the market as the economics of digital media continue to improve.

I’ll share more about our future structure in a few days, but today I want to focus on what will be a difficult week, especially for the people who are leaving the company. These are talented people, friends, and valued colleagues, who’ve made huge contributions to our success, and who’ve done nothing wrong. Even though I’m confident this is the right business decision, it is upsetting and disappointing.

On a personal note, I’ve never thought about my job as “just business.” I care about the people at BuzzFeed more than anything other than my family. This will be a tough week for all of us and I realize it will be much worse for the people losing their jobs. To them, I want to say thank you, I’m sorry our work together is ending this way, and I hope we get to work together again in the future. Our loss will be to the benefit of other organizations where I know you will go on to make formidable contributions.

We will be back to you with specifics on the process by Monday at the latest. Thank you all in advance for your compassion and kindness as we go through this process.

Jonah

Buzzfeed has burnt through over $500 million of investors money which they are unlikely to ever get back. Investors are no longer interested in an online land grab for readers without profits. Peretti is looking to merge the company with rivals as they strive to stem losses. Last year the struggling firm fired over a third of their UK staff. Presumably the UK editor Janine Gibson quit last week because she didn’t want to oversee another round of job cuts…

Owen Jones Turns on “Absolute Disaster” of People’s Vote Campaign

The People’s Vote campaign have been getting an absolute kicking overnight on the back of Alex Wickham’s big expose, following Guido’s report on the campaign infighting last month. Surprisingly, much of it is coming from the left, with Owen Jones leading the charge against it:

“Whatever the rights and wrongs of a second referendum, the official People’s Vote is an absolute disaster, has undermined the case for another vote, and if there is one and they run the Remain campaign, we might as well chalk up a second Leave victory now”

The New Statesman’s George Eaton also piled in with a quote from a ‘senior Labour insider’:

“People’s Vote campaign has a worst of all worlds strategy. It’s fronted in the media by Blairites who are deeply unpopular with voters but knew how to win stuff. Its back room is run by Milibandites who are less elitist but don’t know how to win stuff.”

Predictably, second referendum-backing MPs like Sarah Wollaston have been getting hilariously flustered by the criticism, with Steven Doughty even pinning it on a right-wing conspiracy. Including that well-known right-wing agitator Owen Jones…

Second referendum campaigners are still in denial about three basic facts – firstly there isn’t a majority in Parliament for a second referendum, as significant numbers of Labour MPs will oppose one, secondly there isn’t a majority for a second referendum in the country, as Britian’s leading pollster John Curtice exposed yesterday. Thirdly, sending Tony Blair out as your spokesman on the slopes of Davos is not going to change the first two facts in your favour…

Political Publisher Dods Sees Share Price Plummet, Blames Brexit

Political publisher Dods, whose publications include The House Magazine and PoliticsHome saw their shares plummet 33% yesterday, knocking some £7 million off their valuation. In the last 12 months the shares have halved in value. New CEO Simon Presswell is blaming Brexit for an expected profits collapse because of the ‘unprecedented’ political uncertainty. Insiders blame the losses on a lack of customer interest in new products.

Dods bought into Social360 – a social media monitoring service – which has not sold to clients as well as hoped. Many potential clients manage with a combination of Google alerts and Tweetdeck, both of which are free products. The social media crisis solution seems a bit unnecessary, because when you are in social media crisis, you know it without the need for expensive software. Making their database of “Dods People” acessible via a Salesforce CRM plugin seems like a smart idea until you realise public affairs professionals don’t use Salesforce, sales people do. “DODS Signals”, which “enables the tracking of social media profiles and interactions for over 5,000 political influencers”, is essentially a social media list with bells and whistles, which can pretty much be functionally replicated, for free, in Tweetdeck. Unless you don’t know how to search for a hashtag.

None of this appears to have put Dods off expanding, their new CEO telling CEO Today that when it come to prospective mergers and acquisitions:

“we’ve done an extensive study that identifies tens of thousands of organisations that might possess an interest for us. We have defined the criteria of attributes that we look for in businesses that would benefit under our ownership, and we have applied this as a filter across those organisations and have a very specific target list.

If you imagine a 2×2 chart that has two axis [sic] on it, one is complexity, and the other is value. We are able to place our prospects into the appropriate quadrants: those that are high value and relatively low complexity take our priority, those that are high value and more complex take our second priority, and our third priority is on the opportunities that are not yet at high value and are relatively uncomplex. For those prospects, we will be seeking to partner with a select minority of incubators and innovators to bring on board those businesses and technologies in order to amplify them across our network.”

Shareholders, of which Lord Ashcroft is the biggest, might prefer an uncomplex focus on the bottom line…

Andrew Marr Backs Labour-Style “Customs Deal” for Brexit

The BBC’s flagship political interviewer has been a little bit indiscreet with his personal views on Brexit. According the Estates Gazette, Andrew Marr stood in for Laura Kuenssberg as guest speaker at the British Council for Offices annual dinner last Tuesday, where he told the guests “why he fears no-deal Brexit”.[…] Read the rest

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“Institute for Public Interest News” is a Bad Idea “Institute for Public Interest News” is a Bad Idea
Humphrys Interviews Naked Remainer Humphrys Interviews Naked Remainer
Buzzfeed Firing Another 250 Staff Buzzfeed Firing Another 250 Staff