Your Last Chance to Challenge MPs’ Pay Rise

Despite IPSA “receiving hundreds of responses” – and claiming to have “carefully considered every response we received” – MPs are still set for a 10% pay rise:

“We remain of the view that it is right to increase MPs’ pay to £74,000 for all the reasons we set out in December 2013 and which we summarise above. Subject to any new and compelling evidence arising from this review, we therefore intend to implement the determination as currently drafted, with a one-off adjustment in MPs’ pay to £74,000 and subsequently linking it to changes in average UK earnings for the remainder of this Parliament.”

However:

“That said, we invite submissions as to any new and compelling evidence that might cause us to reconsider. Consultation Question: Is there new and compelling evidence that might lead us to amend our determination?”

Handing MPs a 10% rise while public sector wages are capped at 1% seems pretty compelling.

Send your objections to: mppayandpension@parliamentarystandards.org.uk.




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