Boris Pays Tribute to Peppa Pig Again

Boris didn’t make just one speech featuring Peppa Pig yesterday. After making a pig’s ear of it on his first attempt, he gave it another go later in the day – this time without losing his place, or upending the news flow for about 12 hours. Speaking at the big Centre for Policy Studies’ Margaret Thatcher Conference dinner last night, Boris said:

“I don’t know if you’ve heard the news my friends but yesterday I went to Peppa Pig World […] Hands up who has been to Peppa Pig World? […] I was initially quite hesitant but I found it was very much my kind of place, Peppa Pig World. It had good schools, excellent health care – there’s a bear called […] Dr Brown Bear who turns up no trouble too great, always turns up for in-person consultations. Superb infrastructure – novel transport, mass transit systems systems in Peppa Pig World. And safe streets, virtually no crime that I can see. 

[…]

Peppa’s influence, – she’s got a younger brother called George by the way – Peppa’s cultural influence, is so pervasive that kids in America now say ‘to-mah-to’ instead of ‘tom-ate-o’ and ‘mummy’ rather than ‘mom’ … Anyway, and there you go – that is believed to be a direct result of Peppa Pig and that is the effect of the free trade in which Margaret Thatcher believed.”

If at first you don’t succeed…

mdi-timer 23 November 2021 @ 16:59 23 Nov 2021 @ 16:59 mdi-twitter mdi-facebook mdi-whatsapp mdi-telegram mdi-linkedin mdi-email mdi-comment View Comments
Rishi’s Tax Hikes See UK Fall to Bottom Quartile of OECD’s International Tax Competitiveness Index

Sunak’s corporation tax hike would see the UK’s international tax competitiveness slip from 11th to 30th out of 37 OECD nations, a report from the Centre for Policy Studies (CPS) warns. The report argues that the UK’s outdated business rates system, its planned corporation tax hike from 19% to 25% and the recent national insurance rise would derail Britain’s economic growth. Once all the planned tax rises come in, the UK will fall to thirtieth place on the International Tax Competitiveness Index, well behind competitors such as the United States, Germany, Canada, and Japan…

Tom Clougherty, head of tax at the CPS, explained:

 “There is nothing wrong with getting the budget balanced, but are we going to do more harm than good with more tax increases?

Right on the money… 

A spokesman for the Treasury said:

“This Government has consistently backed business. The UK has a highly competitive business tax regime and remains one of the best places in the world to do business – we have a lower headline rate of corporation tax than any other major comparable economy and generous reliefs for both research and development.”

Is that really true Rishi? Hiking taxes is clearly harming UK competitiveness…

mdi-timer 26 October 2021 @ 14:37 26 Oct 2021 @ 14:37 mdi-twitter mdi-facebook mdi-whatsapp mdi-telegram mdi-linkedin mdi-email mdi-comment View Comments
Starmer’s Big Speech Announces Just Two Policies

The much-hyped speech from Starmer this morning, “A New Chapter for Britain”, has just come and gone, leaving the press and public with just two policies to mull over: a new British recovery bond; and start-up loans for 100,000 new businesses. Anti-climactic would be an understatement…

Last night it was being promised Sir Keir would re-launch his leadership today, with briefings to The Independent, The Guardian and Politico that it would deliver policy proposals on a scale of the 1945 Beveridge Report, which founded the welfare state. Instead, the recovery bond proposal was ripped from the CPS – the think tank founded by Margaret Thatcher – and Northern Recovery Group MPs; and the 100,000 new business loans was launched by the Tories nine years ago in 2012. Oh dear…

Yesterday, Guido pointed out Labour had promised a “policy blitz” this week, however by yesterday afternoon no new policies had been announced. This morning, Anneliese Dodds failed to offer up anyting new the speech would be offering to the electorate in 2024. Has Labour forgotten to un-furlough their policy department?

mdi-timer 18 February 2021 @ 11:53 18 Feb 2021 @ 11:53 mdi-twitter mdi-facebook mdi-whatsapp mdi-telegram mdi-linkedin mdi-email mdi-comment View Comments
MPs Should Set Example on Public Sector Pay Freeze

The Centre for Policy Studies has a paper out revealing that a public sector pay freeze could save up to £23 billion by 2023. They argue that:

  • The economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic has been severe, but the pain has not been shared equally.
  • Private sector workers have suffered far more than those in the public sector as businesses cut hours, wages and jobs.
  • If public sector pay were to be frozen for three years, the government could save a cumulative £23 billion by 2023.
  • As much as £11.7 billion could be saved if the public sector pay increase was limited to 1%.
  • The public sector currently employs roughly 5.5 million employees, at a total cost of around £190 billion a year.

Since the start of the pandemic, private sector workers have suffered far more than those in the public sector, which strengthens the case for public sector pay restraint over the next three years to ensure the labour market isn’t unfairly weighted towards the public sector. MPs are scheduled to get another inflation-busting 4% pay rise, they should set an example by legislating to freeze their own pay.

Robert Colvile, of the CPS, says:

“The economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic has been severe, but the pain has not been shared equally. Some businesses are folding under the strain, public finances have been decimated, while the public sector has escaped relatively unscathed. Healthcare workers aside, it is difficult to justify generous pay rises in the public sector when private sector wages are actually falling.

At the same time, there is a need to control public spending and reduce the structural deficit which the pandemic is likely to have opened up. The Chancellor should redress this imbalance by showing restraint when it comes to pay and pensions in the public sector.”

The Chancellor and the rest of the MPs should not be getting a 4% pay rise.

Download ‘Public Sector Pay: The Case for Restraint’ here.

mdi-timer 20 November 2020 @ 16:30 20 Nov 2020 @ 16:30 mdi-twitter mdi-facebook mdi-whatsapp mdi-telegram mdi-linkedin mdi-email mdi-comment View Comments
Wonk Wars: The Rankings

ComRes have today revealed their rank bank of think tanks, assessing where the esteemed establishments rank among MPs of different parties. Their bi-annual survey of MPs has found that the Centre for Policy Studies and the Institute of Economic Affairs come out on top among Tory MPs, with 65% and 59% of Tory MPs respectively endorsing them for their ‘high quality output’. Free market ideas still rule the roost, despite the leanings of the current party leadership…

Additionally, 39% of Conservative MPs say the CPS is one of the most influential think tanks, with the IEA nearest on 35%. The Centre for Social Justice, Institute for Fiscal Studies and The Taxpayers’ Alliance follow closely behind to round out the top five. The CPS are by far the biggest climbers with a sizable 13% jump, testament to their recent star hires

Labour MPs liked the IPPR best, with the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and IFS falling in behind. On an overall cross-party basis, the top five most influential wonks were the IFS (37%), followed by the JRF (30%), Chatham House (28%), the IEA (28%), and the CPS (24%).

Oddly, the Adam Smith Institute wasn’t included in the list for MPs to choose from, despite some big policy wins this year. Guido hears the CPS has sportingly called on ComRes to include the ASI next time round…

Read the report in full below:

Read More

mdi-timer 5 March 2019 @ 16:45 5 Mar 2019 @ 16:45 mdi-twitter mdi-facebook mdi-whatsapp mdi-telegram mdi-linkedin mdi-email mdi-comment View Comments
CPS Propose ‘Universal Working Income’ to Take Poorest 2.4 Million out of Paying Tax

The Centre for Policy Studies launched their new policy agenda at a snazzy reception with the Prime Minister last night. The first report in the agenda is entitled ‘Make Work Pay’ and suggests a simple change to the UK’s currently ludicrously complicated tax structure.

The CPS’s ‘Universal Working Income’ would see everyone keep the first £1,000 they earn each month entirely tax-free – taking the lowest paid 2.4 million people out of paying both Income Tax and National Insurance altogether. It would be a progressive tax cut, with the poorest seeing the biggest benefits:

It would also be a hugely popular policy – CPS polling reveals it is supported by more than three quarters of the electorate…

mdi-timer 6 November 2018 @ 15:02 6 Nov 2018 @ 15:02 mdi-twitter mdi-facebook mdi-whatsapp mdi-telegram mdi-linkedin mdi-email mdi-comment View Comments
Previous Page Next Page