Plaid “We Wouldn’t Support a Labour Government” Cymru Announce Cooperation Agreement with Labour

Welsh Labour and Plaid Cymru have confirmed the details of a three-year “co-operation agreement” in the Senedd this afternoon, with First Minister Mark Drakeford and Plaid leader Adam Price claiming it will “address issues which take the greatest political and policy effort to resolve”. They also set out the preliminary details of their policy agenda, which includes extending free school meals to all primary school pupils, the expansion of the Senedd, gender quotas in law, and potentially a new voting system. Price added that the deal would “plant together the seed beneath the snow of a new society, a new Wales, a new beginning”, which is a far cry from what he had to say about his new partners just over a year ago…

In September 2020, Price insisted that Plaid

“…Wouldn’t support a Labour government under any circumstances – a Labour-led government under any circumstances…”

When ITV Wales correspondent Rob Osborne asked if that answer would be proven wrong “in a couple of months’ time”, Price gave an emphatic “no“. Which is true, strictly speaking: it took just over a year…

mdi-timer 22 November 2021 @ 16:32 22 Nov 2021 @ 16:32 mdi-twitter mdi-facebook mdi-whatsapp mdi-telegram mdi-linkedin mdi-email mdi-comment View Comments
Ex-MP’s Company Blew Through Public Cash

partners

Ideoba, a government backed technology business set up by an ex MP and a young man he randomly met, has gone out of business with nothing to show for the public money that was pumped into it.

The story of Ideoba goes back to 2010, when ex Plaid Cymru MP Adam Price stepped down from parliament and took up a fellowship Harvard. While there he made an unlikely friendship with an attractive 21 year old man called Andre Auerbach. Two years later they set up a “hi-tech” business together in Bridgend South Wales, with significant funding from the Welsh Government.

The company’s launch was met with much fanfare in the press; Ideoba promised to create 100 local jobs and made extraordinary claims about what it was building. They pitched themselves as the “Google of expertise,” that would have the “capacity to map the total global knowledge base of an estimated three hundred million professionals.”  They also bragged other countries were in a bidding war to lure them away from Wales..

It’s not known exactly how much public money was given to Idebola, but in February Auerbach claimed the Welsh Government had agreed to fund the company by up to £1 million. Two months later the company has closed after employing just 11 people..

mdi-timer 16 April 2015 @ 17:00 16 Apr 2015 @ 17:00 mdi-twitter mdi-facebook mdi-whatsapp mdi-telegram mdi-linkedin mdi-email mdi-comment View Comments