Friday, July 25, 2014

Tory Women Problem: Kevin Hollinrake Selected in Thirsk

estate

The selection to replace Anne McIntosh took place last night in Thirsk and Malton. Former Corby by-election candidate Christine Emmett was lined up by the Tories as the newspaper-friendly female successor. In an act of defiance towards Cameron’s desire to stop people saying the party has a woman problem, Thirsk and Malton Tories instead chose a man, Kevin Hollinrake. He’s a local estage agent. Which will do plenty to restore trust in politics.

There were three rounds of balloting and Hollinrake won in the final round so it was close all the way, though this was a local party which was never going to be told what to do. Voluntary party 1, Dave nil.

UPDATE: Sharon Hodgson has sobered up enough to approve this quote from Labour HQ:

“This sorry episode speaks volumes about the Tories under David Cameron – their sole woman MP in Yorkshire has been deselected amid suggestions of sexism and replaced by a man. For all his claims to be different, David Cameron has done nothing while his party has kicked out one of his most senior MPs. No wonder people think the Tories have a problem with women.”

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Farage’s Fillies
Nigel’s Top Team Has Higher Percentage of Women Than PM’s

women

Nigel Farage now has a higher percentage of women in his top team than David Cameron following UKIP’s reshuffle today. Of the six top jobs announced by UKIP, two are given to women – Louise Bours and Jill Seymour – meaning 33% of Farage’s senior posts are held by ladies. By contrast, just 5 of the PM’s 16 Tory Cabinet positions are held by women, a mere 31%.

farage

Paul Nuttall – Deputy Leader, Education, Skills & Training

Patrick O’Flynn – Economics Spokesman

Steven Woolfe – Immigration and Financial Affairs

Louise Bours – Health Spokesman

Mike Hookem – Defence Spokesman

Jill Seymour – Transport Spokesman

Nige has never had a women problem…

UPDATE: Guido brings you news of five more appointments, including three more women:

Diane James - Justice and Home Affairs

Jane Collins – Employment

Margot Parker – Small Business

Amjad Bashir – Communities

Ray Finch – Fisheries

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Grumbles at the Dave’s BBQ

“No10 summer barbecue last night – cross between a wake (sacked and overlooked) and a stag party (or hen party!) for newly promoted” tweeted Mark Pritchard this morning. While Dave has enjoyed a spectacular turn around in party unity over the last year, there are some jolly bruised members either still on the backbenches, or unwillingly back there. How was the PM’s small talk, Guido asked a few Tory MPs. “Sheepish” says one. “Haughty” said another. Happy holidays!

Monday, July 21, 2014

Crosby Keeps in Running With No 10

Lynton Crosby had a hand in telling several ministers to jog on in last week’s reshuffle, and it seems he certainly knows how to keep in the running with the party leadership. Guido hears the fifty-something campaign guru has, in an effort to be fighting fit for the election, taken on the same personal trainer employed by the Camerons. This one could run and run…

Friday, July 18, 2014

WATCH: Cameron Statement on Ukraine Plane Crash

Via Sky/ITV.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

The Disappointment of a Continental Breakfast

Looks like the only thing anyone was drinking at breakfast was awkward juice…

UPDATE:

Tories Set for Move to Pull Out of ECHR

David Cameron is to announce plans that threaten to pull Britain out of the European Court of Human Rights, Guido understands. Axed Home Office minister Damian Green wrote a paper preparing the government for a move towards withdrawal prior to him losing his job at this week’s reshuffle. Guido is told that the departure of Dominic Grieve as Attorney General paves the way for the government to toughen its stance on the ECHR. Nick Robinson was apparently the desired conduit…

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Cows Moo, Dogs Bark, Labour Deny Tax Increase

Harriet Harman has bitten, writing to David Cameron accusing him of lying about her tax rise comments on LBC:

Dear Prime Minister,

You claimed at Prime Minister’s Questions today that “yesterday Labour announced – in an important announcement – that it is now their policy to put up taxes on middle income people”. This is not true. It is a lie.

In fact, as you surely know, since your own party circulated a transcript later, I had made a straightforward defence of our system of progressive taxation – the idea that people on higher incomes should – and do – pay more in tax overall than people on lower incomes. The full quote is here:

“But I would say Henry one of the things that I would argue that might, should probably make a really big difference to you is having a really good health service. Because you don’t want to have to pay for health insurance. You don’t want to have to pay to go private to get really good healthcare system. And I think that is not just for working class people it’s for middle class people as well. And the same with education, you know, really good school system that helps people from lower income families and middle income families as well so I think that actually the idea that there are some things that help people on low incomes and other that help people on middle incomes. Yes I think people on middle incomes should contribute more through their taxes. But actually they need those public services like the transport system.”
Harriet Harman, LBC, 14 July 2014

It is utterly clear that this is not a call for higher taxes, but a defence of a system which has previously commanded wide support, in which people on middle incomes contribute more than people on lower incomes.

While the principle of progressive taxation has been undermined in recent years, by your Government’s decision to raise VAT and to cut the top rate of tax for the highest earners, even you had not seriously questioned it until today.

Our politics, and the quality of public debate, requires that all participants, however much they may disagree, take part in good faith.

Yours sincerely,

Harriet Harman MP
Deputy Leader of the Labour Party

Does anyone seriously believe Labour won’t raise taxes?

For some reason Harman left this part of the transcript out of her letter, presumably because it included another uncosted spending pledge:

“Well I think that is a very interesting point actually Henry because sometimes people feel that they pay in a lot over a long period of time working hard but when they suddenly need unemployment benefit if they lose their job that actually it is nowhere near enough to actually make them feel that it was worth it for them to contribute. And one of the things that we are talking about is making a higher rate the longer you’ve worked to recognise the contributions you’ve paid in if you lose your job.”

How are they going to pay for that, another bankers’ bonus tax?

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

The New Cabinet in Full

The Cabinet

David Cameron – Prime Minister

Nick Clegg – Deputy Prime Minister

William Hague – First Secretary of State, Leader of the House of Commons

George Osborne – Chancellor of the Exchequer

Danny Alexander – Chief Secretary to the Treasury

Theresa May – Secretary of State for the Home Department

Michael Fallon – Secretary of State for Defence

Vince Cable – Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills

Iain Duncan Smith – Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

Chris Grayling – Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice

Nicky Morgan – Secretary of State for Education, Women & Equalities Min.

Eric Pickles – Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government

Jeremy Hunt – Secretary of State for Health

Elizabeth Truss – Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Justine Greening – Secretary of State for International Development

Alistair Carmichael – Secretary of State for Scotland

Edward Davey – Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change

Patrick McLoughlin – Secretary of State for Transport

Sajid Javid – Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport

Theresa Villiers – Secretary of State for Northern Ireland

Stephen Crabb – Secretary of State for Wales

Philip Hammond – Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs

Also attending Cabinet

Michael Gove – Chief Whip and Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury

Francis Maude – Minister for the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General

Matt Hancock – Minister of State for BIS, DECC and Portsmouth

Esther McVey - Minister of State for Employment

Oliver Letwin – Minister for Government Policy, Lord Privy Seal

David Laws – Minister of State for Cabinet Office, Schools

Grant Shapps - Minister Without Portfolio

Baroness Warsi – Senior Minister of State, Faith and Communities

Greg Clark – Minister of State for Universities and Science

Jeremy Wright – Attorney General

Baroness Stowell - Leader of the House of Lords

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Campaigners Condemn Emergency Big Brother Powers

20140710-085131-31891338.jpg

The PM left his Lobby summer drinks party early last night to hammer out an agreement with rowing ministers over new emergency snooping legislation. This morning Cameron and Clegg announced that fast-track laws would be rushed through to allow spooks to keep snooping on our communications, after it was made illegal in the European courts. Civil liberties campaigners Big Brother Watch have condemned the move:

“It is a basic principle of a free society that you don’t monitor people who are not under suspicion. Considering the Snoopers Charter has already been rejected by the public as well as by the highest court in Europe, it is essential that the Government does not rush head first into creating new legislation.

The EU’s data retention laws privatised snooping, meaning companies were paid by governments to record what citizens were doing and retain that information for a year. We need to get back to a point where the police monitor people who are actually suspected of wrong doing and rather than wasting millions every year requiring data to be stored on an indiscriminate basis.”

Open Rights Group adds:

“The government knows that since the CJEU ruling, there is no legal basis for making internet service providers retain our data so it is using the threat of terrorism as an excuse for getting this law passed. The Government has had since April to address the CJEU ruling but it is only now that organisations such as ORG are threatening legal action that this has become an ‘emergency’. 

Not only will the proposed legislation infringe our right to privacy, it will also set a dangerous precedent where the government simply re-legislates every time it disagrees with a decision by the CJEU. The ruling still stands and these new plans may actually increase the amount of our personal data that is retained by ISPs, further infringing on our right to privacy. Blanket surveillance needs to end.”

No. 10 says the legislation will make life harder for terrorists, crooks and paedos. But it gives the state the power to access the phone and email data of everyone…


Seen Elsewhere

Polling Averages Trend | PoliticalBetting.com
Speaker Faces Questions Over Pass for Donor | Sun
Tory MPs’ Visit to Israel Condemned | Guardian
Labour Was Too Slow for the Squeezed Middle | FT
Papers Pan Cam’s Immigration Pledge | ConHome
Deane of St Edmundsbury? | Times
Pay Volunteers and They Become Cheap Labour | Jill Kirby
UKIP Fundraiser Was Jailed for Running Brothels | Times
Bercow Faces Probe Over Pass Mystery | Mirror
Harman Breaks Rules on Paying Staff | Express
Labour Whinge About Sandi Toksvig Joke | Mail


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John McTernan told Channel 4 News

“You can’t make an omelette without breaking a few eggs, you don’t win in politics without breaking legs.”



Rob Wilson says:

Without Predujice

Darling

What time will dinner be ready this evening?

Yours

Rob Wilson MP

In the interests of me I am placing a copy of this email in the public domain.


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