October 22nd, 2013

Don Foster’s Afternoon Whip Around

New LibDem chief whip Don Foster should learn when to keep his mouth shut. While topping up his legendary booze cabinet in Westminster Tesco’s early yesterday afternoon, a far from salubrious looking Foster treated himself to 40 black Superkings and a tin of Roses. Lucidly chatting with a flirty woman in a lovely grey tracksuit, Foster bragged to his mystery lady friend how he had kept the LibDems in line over yesterday’s nuclear announcement despite her claims that “it’s basically a subsidy”. It’s not really the job of chief whip to publicly agree that there were internal party ructions. Then again, that is what you get if you appoint your third choice chief…


59 Comments

  1. 1
    Moorgeen Colliery coalface says:

    God Bless Maggie.

    How many politicians have been down the pit and visited the coalface?

    http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02708/Maggie-T-12_2708558k.jpg

    Like

    • 4
      Dave from Witney says:

      Spiffing idea….I’ll contact the National Coal Board and you arrange the photographers !!.. Er….hang on….can’t seem to find their number in yellow pages

      Like

      • 6
        Miner's Motto says:

        “I don’t want my sons following me down the pit”

        Like

        • 10
          The Truth will set you free says:

          Funny innit. Labour politicians think the coalface is a fitting place of work for their voters. The person they hate most, Margaret Thatcher saw what it was like first hand and freed former miners from an early grave and in many cases a long debilitating death to go forward into many successful walks of life that they never could have imagined were open to them.

          Like

          • Tachyfartus says:

            Miner: Mrs Thatcher, God bless her!
            Reporter: Uh???
            Miner: She gave me £25000 to buy a house in Spain!

            Like

          • Polly says:

            You simply do not understand. Working underground was so wonderful and miners often said to this to me. Well, they would have said it to me had I met any.

            Like

          • Toxic Labour scum trashed my Country says:

            We in the Labour Party are really disappointed with the working class because we can’t keep them in their place anymore. When we controlled everything the scum, I mean the working class voters really believed Labour was looking after their best interests, Ha Ha.

            Like

          • altruism in industry says:

            like hairdressing ?

            Like

        • 14
          Anonymous says:

          But they go down as divers in the North Sea.

          A modern pit would not have miners. It would just be machines.

          Like

          • Engineer says:

            Believe that, you’ll believe anything.

            Sure, IF someone sank a modern deep colliery it would be more mechanised, but there would still be a need for people down there. Doing anything totally hands-off is spectacularly expensive.

            Like

          • Anonymous says:

            Engineer: No it is not expensive. It is much simpler. To not have to safe a machine against human contact is far more expensive. Nothing is built today with direct controls. So the location of the person is irrelevant.

            Yes there would be workers for maintenance and inspection but operators would be in air conditioned rooms.

            Like

          • Engineer says:

            “Nothing is built today with direct controls.”

            What planet are you on? Road vehicles, earth-moving equipment, tractors, cranes, fork-lift trucks, machine tools…..

            Like

          • ancientpopeye says:

            You’ll say they have pony’s down pits next.

            Like

          • Anonymous says:

            “Nothing is built today with direct controls.” In relation to heavy machinery, for example that mines coal, the subject matter.

            Road vehicles: irrelevant

            Earth-moving equipment: No. They are electrically controlled hydraulic. The controls are remote. They certainly do not pipe all the hydraulic lines to the cab.

            Cranes: No. The one on the local site is operated by a hand held device on the ground.

            Fork lift trucks: Irrelevant, but as a heavy machine they become automated pallet warehouses and are remotely operated.

            CNC machines are all operated remotely and loaded by robots. We are talking production, as in coal, not prototype work.

            Can I add tunnel machines, they have air conditioned control rooms.

            Ships, planes, drones. All are without direct controls. Although they still give the plane pilots windows.

            It is much cheaper to remove all humans to remote locations.

            Like

          • Raymondo Baxterii says:

            Name one pit anywhere in the world that operates as you describe.

            Like

          • Anonymous says:

            I have been part of the jump in technology. The outcome and direct work is probably in your pocket at present.

            If anyone said to us that we could not do something because it was not done by others, we would have made a puddle on the floor.

            Your attitude is exactly why the UK has failed. “If we can not buy, it does not exist.” What a sad limited world you live in.

            Like

          • Raymondo Baxterii says:

            It’s not about the tech it’s about the economics, you twat.

            Like

          • Engineer says:

            Anonymous – If at some point in the future we return to extensive coal extraction in the UK, it is VERY unlikely to be by deep mining. Opencasting is far more economical (and safer).

            Like

          • Anonymous says:

            For both of you the “tech” is the economics.

            As for open reserves that is a matter for nature and those that live there.

            Deep however has only been ever evaluated for standard mining techniques. With face cutters the seam has to be viable. You do not cut rock.

            But once free of humans, the face cutter can be any size. The human does not need to adequately fit. It warps all the economics. Imaging a long wall cutting rig that was tailored for thin seams with the pulverising and coal transport integrated. As long as each element, jacks and cutters, were small and there was one robotic removal unit the maintenance could be done without humans ever leaving the shaft base area.

            Then of course the area could be at the shaft top. A human free mine. No need for oxygen at all. Economics is always about technology.

            Like

          • Raymondo Baxterii says:

            “the “tech” is the economics”

            That is meaningless drivel.

            Like

        • 40
          Minstrel says:

          Can we have a photo of Chukka down there please…

          Like

  2. 2
    everard says:

    seems like a nice boy

    Like

  3. 3
    Ed Balls says:

    Ed B-B-Balls

    Like

  4. 5
    Korporal Klegg says:

    A LibDem will do or say anything for power or a shag.

    Like

  5. 7
    beeBeeSea says:

    Former BBC Radio 1 DJ Dave Lee Travis appears in court where he pleads not guilty to 14 counts of indecent assault and one of sexual assault.

    Like

  6. 8
    Ah! M says:

    Flirty woman catches feinting Foster

    Like

  7. 9
    Engineer says:

    “It’s basically a subsidy.”

    Well, it’s a guaranteed price for electricity delivered to the grid, which amounts to the same thing.

    Question – if it’s OK to subsidise renewables heavily, what’s the problem with subsidising any other method of generation?

    Like

    • 26
      Mitch says:

      A guaranteed price at a higher rate isn’t a subsidy. It’s a bribe, actually.

      Like

    • 27
      The British media are cunts says:

      Where does the subsidy money come from? Why the tax payer of course. We get shafted twice.

      Like

      • 38
        Engineer says:

        True – I’d much prefer a market without ANY subsidies. However, you’ll pay the cost of production whether through your bill or the tax system.

        Wind power produces not much but very expensive electricity. You pay a high proportion of that by way of direct subsidy. Nuclear power produces a lot of electricity, but the capital cost of the plant is high so investors want some guarantee of a return on capital invested – hence the guaranteed price.

        If we have to have subsidies, I’d rather it went to a generator that actually produced consistently, not to ineffective ones.

        Like

  8. 11
    Long John Silver's parrot says:

    A Liberal who cannot hold his pop.

    Do you think this is really news worthy?

    Like

  9. 13
    Dave says:

    I will not nationalise British electricity generation, instead I will supply it at twice the price using French and Chinese nationalised industry.

    Like

    • 20
      Dave is strange says:

      How come Dave can find 80 billion for a train line only the BBC want and nothing for new power stations that only the BBC don’t want?

      Like

      • 31
        The British media are cunts says:

        Because the train line will allow BBC lefties to get out of that shithole called Salford quicker and back to London where they can fuck their 12 year old boyfriends, snort quality coke and have a good nights arse shagging in Hampstead Hearh.

        Like

    • 22
      Ed Milliboyband says:

      It will only be supplied at twice the price if it gets built. One challenge that seems to be getting overlooked is that the construction site will be occupied by green eco-loons wanting to stop/delay construction. My bet is a planning and construction phase closer to 20 years then 10.

      Like

      • 33
        On the nod says:

        Nah. Hinkley point is already surrounded by razor wire and ten foot of no-mans land, planning will also be a cinch as they are building on a current site. The madness was decommissioning the old coalstations and then selling the land off.

        Like

    • 29
      Cheap Energy is a thing of the past just like cheap food...get used to it says:

      The government are forecasting that in 10 years time when it comes on line that energy costs will have doubled but wages will have declined along with living standards…that will be the case whoever is in power be it Labour or Conservative

      Like

  10. 16
    FFS says:

    Don Foster. MP for Bath and complete and utter wanker, and that’s BEFORE you start looking at his politics.

    Like

  11. 17
    King Cnut says:

    Wot a load a w****rs.

    Like

  12. 24
    Casual Observer 4 says:

    That the UK faces a serious energy generation shortfall explains completely two things:

    i) Claims of economic growth and development are total fiction.
    - There will be no meaningful growth as energy consumption will at best need to be held flat. The only GDP growth in the UK over next five years will be a result of people taking on more debt. That additional debt burden should reduce energy demand as individual incomes will be required to cover interest payments, particularly when interest rates begin to rise.

    ii) Why there is a desire to push people into denser accommodation through withdrawal of spare room subsidy.
    - This will force people out of less energy efficient primarily homes as they may not be able to square the additional cost with reduction in energy consumption. Those that can are being coerced to reduce heating / powering spare rooms.

    - A good question is whether coercing people from 2 to 3 bedroom accommodation into single bedroom accommodation will have the effect of reducing their overall energy needs.

    Whoever said that the UK is not a centrally planned economy ? :-)

    Like

    • 36
      Utter deapair says:

      The big savings in energy consumption will be gained when the last of the intensive energy users decamp the UK PLC and locate to cheaper energy areas. Aluminium, Glass, Chemicals consume vast amounts of energy and they will leave….Problem solved. err perhaps not!

      Like

      • 41
        altruism in industry says:

        melting stuff does take a lot of energy. It’s a pity that gold is so scarce, it is a wonderful metal which can be fused by hitting it with a hammer.

        Like

  13. 34
    Anonymous says:

    Only 18% of the final consumption of energy in this country is via electricity.

    45% is via Petroleum products. Yet we bleat on about power stations.

    No one has noticed we do not have capacity in our refineries.

    London has NO refinery now. It imports product.

    England has only 4 refineries. Wales 2, and Scotland 1.

    What would happen if a hiccup occurred. May be a big hiccup like the Texas explosion. Maybe a small hiccup like an unplanned failure. Or an deliberate failure by workers or others.

    London lost Coryton because it happened during the crisis. Losing that much infrastructure in one go simply due to not having the ability to invest was worse than any current power station issue.

    It takes years to create a monster like that, and just one day to destroy it. That was when the goverment should have woken up.

    Like

  14. 35
    Handycock says:

    I no longer take the whip.

    Like

  15. 42
    Worried Parents, without warning? WTF is Dave prattling on about? says:

    Like

  16. 44
    FFS says:

    Don Foster should marry Dawn Primarolo. They are more or less made for each other. Both are a couple of arrogant wankers. I woudn’t piss on them if either of them were on fire and that has nothing to do with their politics, they are just tossers.

    Like

    • 45
      Alf Garnett says:

      Absolutely right. When either of these people are politely asked questions about anything, the self-righteous rudeness, sneering and general oafishness is absolutely revolting.

      I would take issue with you over the matter of their politics. Each exemplifies the worst aspects of their respective parties.

      In Foster’s case, it is the lying, deceitful, opportunistic and completely unprincipled LibDems. Primarolo is the embodiment of the nannying, dirigiste, and mendacious New Labour. She also appears to have inherited Mandelson’s moustache.

      An all-round rotten pair, to be sure.

      Like

  17. 50
    Living in 98.11% white Merseyside says:

    I smoke Superkings blue. I used to be on 40 a day but I’ve cut down to under 20.
    Not for financial reasons considering how much I get with my benefits and pensions but I only smoke in one room upstairs (my study) rather than the whole flat.

    Like


Seen Elsewhere

Ruffley Could Be Suspended From Commons | Telegraph
Ruffley Loses Confidence of Constituency | Guardian
Ruffley Under Pressure to Quit | Telegraph
Gove Launches Ruffley Probe | Staggers
Clegg Must Fire David Ward | Sun
David Ruffley’s Campaign Against Domestic Violence | Buzzfeed
LibDem Criticises Clegg Over Farage Debates | Express
Ruffley Must Go | Guardian
Political Correctness Breeds Extremism in Schools | Chris McGovern
Ruffley Faces Crisis Meeting | ITV
I Sang “Maggie Out” (When I Was 7) | Liz Truss


new-advert
Westbourne-Change-Opinion Guido-hot-button (1)


New Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond has big ambitions in his first meeting with Benjamin Netanyahu today:

“I came to bring this conflict to an end.”



Flight Watch says:

Russia Today is a cauldron of bullsh*t. The only people that take it seriously are deluded conspiracy theorists. Other RT journos have resigned citing the same reasons.

It’s about as believable as Press TV, KCNA of North Korea or the Daily Mirror.


Tip off Guido
Web Guido's Archives

Subscribe me to:






RSS




AddThis Feed Button
Archive


Labels
Guido Reads