February 18th, 2013

WATCH: Dave on Tour


279 Comments

  1. 1
    SamCam says:

    Thats my Dave playing hit ball with the all Indian Bum Boy hit Ball team

    Like

  2. 2
    keredybretsa says:

    over&out

    Like

    • 28
    • 42
      40 million acres of uk farm land says:

      “over” means I have finished I wait for your response.
      “out” means I am gone
      so you cannot say the two together you donk

      Like

      • 62
        Marinus Anton Donk says:

        Technically you are right. But it has become a common, if mistaken, exclamation.

        I thought it was rather clever due to the reference to an over in cricket and Dave being bowled out within a concise form.

        But I spent my career examining the taxonomy of mushrooms so what do I know?

        Like

        • 72
          milibanana says:

          which poisonous ones I can give my brother but no-one will know – the scrote nicked my job

          Like

        • 254
          Blinded by science says:

          So tax mushrooms and boost the economy. Are any spare mush”rooms” to be taxed too?

          Like

          • Haribo Halfwit says:

            Play at being a modern Robin Hood: Tax big houses like his. Make sure yours is just below the price where you have to pay it.

            Like

      • 189
        Z Cars says:

        You can on my programme you dork
        Over and out.

        Like

      • 273
        keredybretsa says:

        donk yerself….intelegentsia i s..t ‘em!

        Like

    • 111
      Anonymous says:

      over&out is the way that all clean avenues to masterly simple vedic knowledge is blocked.
      .
      the example of the sacred Banyan tree by the river bank is interesting.
      when looked at it in its reflection in the water…we discover the roots go upwards towards the real nr the relected sky…..implying that the roots of all knowledge is in the sky.
      .
      all reality is in the shadow which in itself is not still as our waterey emotions come in the way.
      .
      The tree represents the tree of knowledge coming to us from the skies via the trunk branch and the leaves…..in the form of the ancient 4 vedas.

      Like

      • 124
        Anonymous says:

        1. all knowledge comes from the root.
        2. the root of all knowledge is in the sky.
        3. The delivery point of all knowledge are the leaves on tree of knowledge.
        ….
        4. all reality is below the surface…underground?
        ….
        5. when faced directly it gets distorted by our unstill watery emotions.
        .
        it seems that the masterly folks can get 3 hits with one strike…given that when we are nodding off we can be 3 steps away from reality. in one hit lord mcalp…silenced the uncontrolled flow of news and opinion on the state tele, commercial tele and the twitterati in the news cycle.
        .
        the world is not 2 birds 1 stone…it is oe strike ..3 hits. oh. la.la.

        Like

      • 276
        keredybretsa says:

        All very, very, hinteresting! But this troublous Banyan tree seems to be the cuckoo of the tree world.

        Like

  3. 3
    Kebab Time says:

    By a girl as well!

    Needs to spend more time in the nets!

    Like

  4. 4
    on me head son... says:

    but not a dead duck nicely stroked david

    Like

  5. 6
    Common Purpose are Mongs says:

    Are they looking to start a new course in cricket ?

    Like

  6. 9
    Geoffrey Boycott says:

    My grandmother could have blocked that all day.

    He should learn to be a bit less expansive and bored them to death for 3 weeks before taking advantage and scoring a run on the 22nd day.

    Like

    • 10
      Kebab Time says:

      Well said Geoff! #digin

      Like

    • 26
      Mike Hunt says:

      He still managed 8114 in tests…….

      Like

    • 39
      Labour in Action says:

      No no no! The correct way is to shackle your best players’ legs together to even things up for everybody, then throw the bat at everything willy-nilly, even before the ball leaves the bowler’s arms. In fact, you should always play the ball several deliveries earlier than it arrives.

      At the end of the game, the two teams totals should be added together before the umpires deduct 50% in tax. What’s left is divided by 22. These runs are then allocated to each player in the two teams so that the scorecard shows no winners or losers and all are seen to be equal.

      Like

  7. 11
    old SHEP says:

    Can’t be long before he gets run out.

    Like

  8. 13
    pee says:

    is it national no eating food day today or summat?
    what the fuck is all the nonsense on the telly and in the papers?
    old people and people in hospital and disabled are dying each day under this twatish government and all they can do is say don’t eat , fucks sake

    Like

    • 57
      CarryHole is a stupendous Hunt says:

      537 Most doctors are very uncomfortable with the fact that people over 65 who are overweight or obese live longer than those who are of “normal” weight. Not only does this run counter to the deep puritanism of medical culture, but it also flies in the face of logic, because such people are much more likely to have diabetes, heart failure and hypertension.

      And yet obese people with hypertension have the best outcomes, in trial after trial. And if you give them thiazide diuretics and so increase their insulin resistance, they do even better. And if they get heart failure, they will greatly outlive their thinner peers.

      http://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2013/02/18/richard-lehmans-journal-review-18-february-2013/

      I think they’re trying to kill us.

      Like

      • 125
        Residing in 96.99% white Merseyside says:

        C4 News managed tonight to have special reports on:-

        Obesity
        The horse meat scandal
        Drinking alcohol whilst pregnant

        Boring, boring, boring!

        Like

      • 128
        Casual Observer says:

        One thing that government doesn’t like to talk about, but which is very clear, is that the forecasts for average longevity which have been put together have been seriously off for a long time. Like since the 1960s.

        The average lifespan of a person is important for government to know in order to calculate cost of providing services, and in particular pension obligations.

        The error was likely introduced first due to distorted historical data. War and pre-WWII health and hygiene conditions generally kept longevity down.

        Since WWII, Europe has not seen major conflict and after the NHS was created in the UK, healthcare greatly improved. Knowledge in the public, improved diet etc. also played a part.

        Government needs people to die off as it cannot afford to provide services in the way it is at the moment. This is more a raw resource availability issue than just money.

        There has been an attempt to reduce population by reducing fertility and lowering average age, but all that has happened is that people are living longer and having less children. That is actually worst for government.

        The next step will of course be a final solution of sorts, or major conflict. We have already seen the former being tried out in hospitals. The suicide rate begets another facet of that.

        A rather dystopian reality when you look at it, which seems too fantastical to be true. But it is true.

        Much of the Europe can be viewed as being covered with a lot of poorly productive aging animals which demand to be fed, watered and given shelter (energy). These animals will get violent if pushed, otherwise they are quite sedentary and apathetic. As the animals age the amount of resource they consume increases, whilst their production decreases.

        The animals being apex predators can become very dangerous if their needs are not met.

        That is reality.

        Like

        • 131
          CarryHole is a stupendous Hunt says:

          They’ve already started eating their own children.

          Like

        • 275
          recycled pensioner says:

          Assisted suicide available to all, freed of legal problems, will almost certainly be with us before long. A period of softening up through the msm will of course be necessary, but that hasn’t been a problem with social and economic matters in the past.

          Like

  9. 14
    Tay King-dePisse says:

    Bowled– and there was I, thinking Dave is always stumped!

    Like

  10. 16
    john77 says:

    His game is Squash not cricket. Let’s have a video of you running 5,000 metre track.

    Like

  11. 19
    Sachin Gangoogly says:

    Think Dave’s been stitched up. Video shows cutaway of girl running up to bowl; him being bowled, then girl mysteriously being absent when he goes to congratulate the fielders.

    Dirty tricks.

    Like

    • 21
      on me head son... says:

      very observant bwana

      Like

    • 30
      old SHEP says:

      Dave actually scored 357 runs after batting for 8 hours in tropical heat.

      Like

      • 115
        Mr Quelch says:

        When I went to India , I got Runs — lots and lots of them. Imodium had zero effect.

        Like

        • 258
          Blinded by science says:

          You should have taken a few bottles of Dr Colis-Browne’s mixture. Liquid instant cement, guaranteed every time.

          Like

      • 161
        Prof. International Human Rights Law says:

        All in all a good innings. Just taken straight out of the BBC “art of the VT”, never give away the whole game!!! Always leave the truth out, but allude to it liberally.

        Like

  12. 22
    Casual Observer says:

    He’s trying to sell substandard university courses to smart people.

    This is what awaits them:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/jul/26/kiaran-stapleton-anuj-bidve-killer

    And dead nurses / the Vaz treatment.

    There is also Common Purpose aspect.

    Like

  13. 23
    Mad, Bad & Dangerous Gordon McRuin ( Member in absentia ) says:

    Her bowling action reminds me of the good old days….

    Like

    • 33
      Point of information says:

      But they have still not reclaimed the 24% lost since 2009.

      Like

      • 43
        Mad, Bad & Dangerous Gordon McRuin ( Member in absentia ) says:

        Sales still sluggish since I was thrown out of number 10 retired gracefully from politics ? Reputation recovering as I’m no longer associated with the brand.

        Like

        • 122
          The wizz says:

          Their New all singing all dancing device is now ruggedized to withstand a collision with an speeding bullet. However, I do not not believe it’s McRuin proof. He could destroy the World given half the chance.

          Like

  14. 24

    Weren’t there any seals there he could bat to death?

    Like

  15. 29
    The BBC causes serious mental illness says:

    Why so many programs on radio 4 about Orwell 1984 ?

    Are they taking the p!ss or is it an anniversary ?

    And since when is it a favorite of the right ? It is the blueprint for the perfect socialist state.

    Like

    • 36
      old SHEP says:

      No mention of Animal Farm?, poor old Boxer reduced to a ready meal, and after all his efforts to build another windmill.

      Like

    • 96

      Orwell was actually a good lefty.

      Discuss.

      Like

      • 109
        Sir William Wade says:

        Orwell was too much of a realist to be a really good leftie or rightie. He hated the class system because, I suggest, he saw it as a con, a way of tricking people into acting against their own interests and accepting a lot of crap. So, authoritarian socialism was just a replacement con, with its own rigid class system.

        Like

      • 112
        Casual Observer says:

        His essay on the use of English in politics confirms that for me.

        His stance against totalitarianism and favor of democratic socialism can be taken as good, even though the most noxious of socialist regimes in the world typically invoke democratic in their name. He did not regard Stalin’s Russia or the Soviet system as being socialist.

        To me he is more a center left libertarian, the only major negative was his advocacy of a Federal socialist Europe. That is only a negative though as its attempted realization has been such a failure as we can now see.

        Like

        • 139

          Provoked by that recent link of yours, I have read its content to others who derived much pleasure from its contents. It was already known to me but came as a welcome reminder. Does the way you might pronounce the word about give any clue to your provenance?

          Like

          • Casual Observer says:

            Pronounced the English way, with a slight mid-west twang which is once again becoming more English, if that answers your question.

            Am totally cool with center left libertarian’s, but myself much more to the conservative right of the picture.

            To give an idea, Rand’s philosophy I enjoy. But even she changed her tune when her needs must. And in later life she met Orwell, in a sense.

            Orwell of course was ahead of her transition though, when he put down:

            ‘Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.’

            - In that essay.

            In discourse, that should be held up as the counter to any claims of hypocrisy, when hypocrisy is emphatically not intended.

            Like

          • That point vi. which you quote turns an excellent essay into a great one.

            For me, it plays to huge areas of knowledge way beyond the issue of the written word, as I remarked on that page.

            Your final statement on the hypocrisy is a very interesting thought to which I agree. It exists more in intention than in expression. But how can one tell through the fog of subjectivity? One man’s hypocrisy…

            A final tale. I am passionate about architecture (amongst many such subjects.) When I used to spend so much time in London, I invariably took the opportunity to explore the city which I thought I knew so well. I merely peeled a few more layers off the almost unlimited amount of intrigue there. One of the things I did manage was to visit every extant Wren church in London – except one.

            Then in 2001, after 9/11, I spent over five weeks in the States exploring places which I had previously missed. I managed to see my missing Wren church, site of that great speech.

            Like

          • Casual Observer says:

            @SC: When it was raised the other day, point iv, the full impact of it hit me. This is in no way meant to be flippant, but grasshopper (yours truly) learned well that day. The deepness of that line hadn’t hit home before then: Wollstonecraft was a good case in point.

            It could be suggested that when the broader context for what is said and/or done is not taken into account, that is when spoken words and actions suffer from a Poe’s law problem.

            For contrary statements / actions or a change of position, assuming hypocrisy is the refuge of the cynic, but gullibility is that of a naive believer. Neither the cynic nor the naive believer is being critical or thinking deeper about why contrary words are said, or actions performed in that model.

            That is where rule ( vi ) forms the basis of a good hypothesis test to determine motives behind contrary actions / changes of position. At the least it provides a framework which is unquestionably moral and is most likely subconsciously followed by most.

            The beauty is that it can be used as a counter argument in discourse, and by people of either persuasion if they are willing to probe deeper. It allows in debate for a position to change on moral grounds and the debate to remain open rather than forcing a change of position in confrontational ways which inevitably closes debate down.

            I haven’t visited Westminster College yet, but that is on my list. Can recommend Hubert H. Humphrey to you if interested in good speeches. Perhaps not as notable a lecturer or lecture as some of the other sinuous luminaries who have spoken there, but he should not be overlooked.

            Like

          • Casual Observer says:

            Have not been to Westm!nster College yet. Will do one day.

            Can recommend Hub3rt Humphr!es to you. A green lecturer, alongside our Sinew man. Perhaps not as famous as some of the others who have spoken there, but is worth looking up, particularly for profound quotes.

            Like

          • It is a visit which will repay you. They have done a wonderful job and it stands out on a grassy knoll looking more like a typical Austrian church setting than it would have done in London, cheek-by-jowl with the other buildings.

            I see HH’s speeches are being digitised by Minnesota HS.

            Like

          • Casual Observer says:

            Yes. They are worth a read. Johnson’s was a strange presidency and Humphries was one of the best VPs IMHO. 1963 was a pivotal year indeed, even more so if you’ve read Sk0usen.

            To your point on the church: Agreed. The setting is very Austrian, but those Wren churches are unmistakable. The only other Austrian aspect I could see is that the building is very clean. (in the online pictures) Unpainted though, Portland stone is tough to beat.

            Have you seen the remains of the other one which moved, in Twickenham ?

            Like

        • 146
          CarryHole is a stupendous Hunt says:

          “democratic” socialism will always settle into a fail pattern of buying votes by demonising wealth creators.

          Like

          • Casual Observer says:

            Non libertarian democratic socialism will as the moral hazard of allowing the electoral process to become corrupted as you outline is not checked properly.

            Orwell balked at the situation which you outline, which is one reason he did not hold much truck with the socialist systems which were in place at the time. It is also why he tried to alert the world to the danger as he could see very clearly where that path led.

            FYI: Just for disclosure, I am not a socialist.

            Like

      • 156
        Your Friendly Neighbourhood Orwell Literary Appreciation Service says:

        In much the same way as Orwell, in his essay on Charles Dickens, observes that there is enough in Dickens’s work to satisfy both G.K. Chesterton and T.A. “Tommy” Jackson politically and socially, Orwell himself strikes that same note with the 21st Century reader. Orwell claims that GKC sees Dickens as “almost a Catholic” and Jackson sees him as “almost a Socialist,” both perhaps projecting, and then seeing that which they are prepared to see, Dickens being a Rorschach blot of sorts. Those who hew Left will talk about how Orwell spoke about how the British system was gerrymandered in about a hundred different ways to preserve the class structure, while those of the Right see Orwell’s rebuke of the Communist Satan and all its pomps and snares. The Left feel uncomfortable with Orwell’s love of the indigenous British culture, one which he himself admitted was probably flawed, but, on the whole, no worse (and probably better) than many others. And the Right can’t warm up to his essential democratic socialism (as he understood the concept). In many ways he is as loved as Ayn Rand is hated and for much the same offence: Pulling the beneficent mask off the face of collectivism. Orwell would have replaced the mask with a man with a real face, and Rand would have torn the face off collectivism as well as the mask. Both are disappointments in their personal lives to those who would lionise them as a secular sort of saint. But both were voices crying in the wilderness of their time, telling the world: “You REALLY don’t want to go down the path these preachers are touting– it only leads to death.” The nail that sticks out is the one that gets hammered, says a Japanese proverb, but Orwell didn’t care– and that, probably more than the content of his beliefs, is what appe*als to most people today.

        Like

        • 231

          Pulling the beneficent mask off the face of collectivism.

          This is the most powerful aspect of the argument but it is increasingly ignored. It seems that imagery has won the day in writings to an extent that if a strong one cannot be created, then there can be little of value to be had in the thought.

          At the other extreme, the greater the hyperbole, the more effective the thought is which is conveyed by the imagery. Bedroom Tax is one which comes to mind. Having created this image, jewellery tax appears as an antidote.

          Orwell’s Big Brother gives way to Endemol’s.

          Like

  16. 31
    rebekah aka nellnewman says:

    And whilst cameron is in India trying to strengthen trading links with one of the fastest growing economies in the world – dear old militwit is trawling his worn out message of ‘no more austerity -time to spend spend spend’ – around the lefty leaders of the EU.

    I note he’s gone to Denmark 1st where kinnochio’s daughter in law is prime minister. No doubt he’ll also be visiting his bosom pal monsieur hollande the failing french president .

    Lord help us if this idiot ever gets into no 10.

    Like

    • 35
      Point of Information says:

      France needs a second revolution to purge the loony left there.

      Like

      • 41
        rebekah aka nellnewman says:

        the loony left are a big part of french dna – although hollande is the most unpopular president ever I believe – so maybe they’ll swing back to the right at the next election.

        Like

        • 52
          cityferret says:

          sarky tried that but when he got in he found he couldn’t get the unions to deflate the public sector and the wheels fell off everything after that..since then its tanking and hollande a feeble socialist just as powerless

          Like

    • 37
      rebekah aka nellnewman says:

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/9876267/UK-doubles-exports-to-BRICS-since-crisis.html

      and this is why cameron is in India – our exports to BRICS more than doubled last year from £12billion to £27billion.

      We need good trading relations with these countries if we are ever going to escape the leaching EU.

      Like

      • 48
        Do You Think That's Really Wise? says:

        WTF are we exporting to them? Only I’ve not purchased anything recently that is made in this country so I can only assume it’s capital goods of some kind? Be nice to think it was real manufacturing lead exports.

        Like

        • 54
          Casual Observer says:

          Exporting to !ndia is a good idea, yes.

          If it involves the Euromongs tagging along in tow though, then no.

          Jobs do need to be repatriated, and it is perverse that we are still giving them Foreign Aid, but only because the jobs are needed here and !ndia is no longer needing of Foreign Aid.

          Like

        • 61
          rebekah aka nellnewman says:

          apparently 8 out of every 10 cars built in UK is exported along with medical equipment, machinery etc

          Like

          • Point of Information says:

            Cars are generally not exported to !ndia. They make their own there.

            Medical equipment may go over, but most of the exports are armament technologies and civil nuclear.

            In the UK’s case as well, financial services related are also a major export.

            Like

          • we gave them the deal.. says:

            tata

            Like

      • 59
        CarryHole is a stupendous Hunt says:

        Exports are the COST of imports.

        Although trade in either direction is good.

        Like

  17. 45
    Jimbo says:

    Is there a difference between “Bowled out” and ” Kicked out ” I think Dave will experience both.

    We the British Taxpayer have been giving millions of pounds to India in aid to cover education , lack of food etc (even though it was going to buying arms from Russia etc) and we have to open our door to unlimited immigration to bring in High Tech Knowledge so what the bloody hell has happened to our educated brains of tomorrow ? perhaps our education has been concentrating on social studies and all of that crap, the favourite of the sick lefties.

    Like

    • 64
      Point of Information says:

      Most of ‘our educated brains of tomorrow’ either went abroad and are doing well, or got stuck in the socialist cesspit which Labour recreated in UK.

      Like

  18. 46
    Brown out and pay me damages. Time for the arsehole to move on and take his socialist Scroungers with him. I am fed up with this tripe. says:

    Are we still paying India for its space programme?

    Like

  19. 47
    Anonymous says:

    I hope that the appalling lib/dems win Eastleigh with a large majority. That may lead to the ousting of Cameron. It is the only chance that we have of a Conservative government in 2015.

    Like

  20. 50
    I am not related or connected to Edinburgh socialist, scrounging scum. says:

    Time for him to get the economy up and running or it will be new Balls.

    Like

  21. 51
    Tosspot says:

    Pussy Whipped ?

    Like

  22. 56
    40 million acres of uk farm land says:

    will the 40% of the population who are not sustainable fuck off back where they came from ? thanks

    Like

    • 108
      Con Artists says:

      No we’re here to occupy your country and breed.

      We need bigger houses so get used to paying more taxs.

      Inshaaaaallllaaaa

      Like

  23. 63
    Mr Kendal Mint Cake says:

    At least he looks a better batsman than John Major did. He needs to move his feet more though.

    Like

    • 88
      Fitbad the Tailor says:

      He needs to wear pads and some white clothing. Apart from that, he plays a straight bat. His cover drive looked OK.

      Like

  24. 68
    The BBC are cunts says:

    Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh !!!

    Like

  25. 69
    Brown out and pay me damages. He can scrounging, socialist vermin with him. says:

    Pathetic!

    Like

  26. 74
    Red Egg Millitit.....oh nooooo says:

    Hope the BofE can talk down the Pound even further this week…. f*cking Hunts !!

    Like

  27. 77
    • 82
      One Term Dave says:

      Have no fear. My government is in the ball as far as limiting immigration is concerned.

      Like

    • 110
      Con Artists says:

      Now they are here, they have a right to family life.
      So thanks to the ECHR and the EU they cannot be sent home.
      You have to pay their benefits and their housing benefit etc etc etc.

      When will you plebs wake up and realise this country doesn’t make the laws any more…. The EU does…..

      How many more examples do you want ?

      Wake the fcuk up !!

      Like

      • 135
        The wizz says:

        Now remind everyone who signed us up to this ECHR travesty? It certanly not was the Yachtsman Ed Heath, nor was it the Lady Thatcher (thinks, never seen a lady Thatcher). Now come on the bloggers, who was it?

        Like

        • 237
          Average joe says:

          All three LibLabCon are pro EU..

          That is all that matters.

          You want more EU ? You vote for them.

          Personally I’m sick to the back teeth of the current lot and I think Nigel Farage is a decent, honest man with integrity. He deserves a chance, and as ukip are the only party offering to take us out of the EU, he is getting my vote.

          Like

  28. 83
    Sir William Wade says:

    You won’t see him bowling – no-balls.

    Like

    • 87

      You mean, he would surely not bowl to the ‘ed?

      Like

      • 94
        Sir William Wade says:

        …..and it’s a change to see Dave on the front foot.

        Like

        • 97

          Why, sir, are you so clearly misspelling your name?

          Is there an automated symposiarch issue behind this?

          If so, I hope you will not be offended if I offer you the following to incorporate in the normal place courtesy of the Cyrillic:

          аа

          Like

          • Tachybaptus says:

            Probably the original Sir William Waad spelt his name in all kinds of ways, like his contemporary Shaxper. I think they did it for fun.

            Like

          • Sir William Wade says:

            The Modbot takes exception to the name ‘Waad’. It is a brute machine.

            Like

          • @WW I would regard it as an honour if you were to copy and paste those letters to see if it worked.

            @Tachy Understand and agree. Possibly, no one here is as well read as you. I am a novice in comparison.

            Like

          • Universal Hiss says:

            Modbot is surprisingly unlibertarian. Must remember not to type d8r8i8v8e p8i8s8s8e8d or h8y8p8e8r8o8c8i8t8e

            Will that do? It’s strangely difficult to read with an 8 rather than a *.

            Like

          • Casual Observer says:

            The m0db0ts algorithm moves in mysterious ways.

            There may be a subtle correlation with Carry Holes hang0vers.

            Like

          • H8o8n8g K8o8n8g also.

            Like

          • Casual Observer says:

            Take the bits of this article:

            http://tinyurl.com/acomhrb

            Which may interest a l!bel lawyer, and the m0db0t will make more sense.

            Like

          • CarryHole is a stupendous Hunt says:

            This site’s gone downhill since the messy haired idiot started “helping”…

            Like

          • Carry Hole is a quality journalist says:

            No it hasn’t.

            Like

          • @CO

            I have even saved this to my drіve. It accords with my knowledge of the man. I have already stated that I find myself in 80% agreement with him, which is quite high. That I am not a republican is the biggest difference I have found. I now know that the desire to return us all to Catholicism was rather less than serious.

            Perhaps the most reassuring thing one can take away from that article are the comments from the majority of posters on the page. That is the sort of bile from this direction that informs you that your path is probably a pretty good one.

            Like

          • @CHiaSH

            The problem is probably that there has not been enough life experience here to appreciate some of the more refined aspects of judgment which age brings to an individual. Dogma trumps critical thinking. Against this and in an attempt to be fair (for a reason I cannot answer), the view of the previous establishment needs to be challenged.

            As an instinctive contrarian, I have mostly benefited from swimming against the flow, except it makes it harder for some to appreciate my views. One has to get to the point of being moderately well established to take such a position though.

            An insignificant example of this was when I used to visit exhibitions at the Sainsbury Wing of the National Gallery. With a very popular exhibition, where you get timed access, the crowds can prevent you from appreciate the very works you have travelled to see. I hit upon the idea of viewing the exhibits in an anti-clockwise direction. That way, I was normally standing by myself, away from the crowd which would trail from the other direction.

            This approach can be carried into many other aspects of life with a huge increase in enjoyment and effectiveness. One simply has to ignore the occasional hostility of the sheep, not a great hardship.

            Like

    • 105
      Mr Johnny Wad says:

      Someone need balls ?

      Like

    • 137
      The wizz says:

      Bill, he will never make a Francis Drake.

      Like

    • 154
      Blowing Whistles says:

      Some food for thought
      Governments never ever lie to the masses

      When our Pesnions were robbed – The on message political hacks BLAMED THE PUBLIC – in the end. They said we didn’t put enough in, in the first place! [Who instigated the pensions 'holidays'?]

      When Hillsborouhg happened – The on message political hacks BLAMED THE PUBLIC.

      The horsemeat scandal broke and now slowly The on message political hacks are starting to BLAME THE PUBLIC – Its the publics fault. [Notice a pattern beginning to develope here?] The horsemeat scandal is actually the EU’s fault – but don’t tell the mass public.

      The 1200 Staffordshire deaths – will of course be blamed on the public…

      Oh and of course the Credit Card and Banking debts (Inc deaths / suicides) … you guessed it … it was the public who are all to blame for it – not them nice little bankers atop each bank with their cast iron legally written up; get out clauses protecting them in any worst case scenario with their gagging pay offs and protected pensions!

      It’s really only criminal when it’s a member of the public – but they have to give up the occasional Huhne or two to give the impression that it’s democratic innit?

      Like

      • 169
        old SHEP says:

        Methinks the pretence is all now wearing very thin, unless you are an individual of the terminally thick kind, but plenty of those still around it seems.

        Like

        • 195
          Blowing Whistles says:

          That old boring goebbels adage of if you tell them and repeat it enough – they will believe it – has actually had its day – because with the modern technology they (ptb) do not control the propaganda machines like what they all used to throughout the 40′s, 50′s, 60′s and 70′s.

          But don’t tell the mongrels in the MSM – that its all blown away – let them still think that it still works. In fact I’ve been having fun watching the MSM in cahoots with their string-pullers trying to prove it still does work. ITS OVER!!!!

          Like

          • old SHEP says:

            Mr Leveson wants to try and redress the ‘balance’, and who are we to presume to lecture him about democracy?, such impertinence.

            Like

          • Not Blowing Whistles says:

            The circulation figures, even though they are a fiction of sorts anyway these days – more a poll projection – demonstrate that.

            As does the honest and consistent feedback in the comments section from non party activists.

            What will be interesting to see is:

            i) Will government start listening to the people and acting accordingly ? They have no excuse not to now as there is plenty captured across the net.

            ii) At what point will circumstances force ( i ) to happen.

            You are quite right that control of the propaganda source has and is shifting. The wake up for people is realizing that.

            Like

          • Blowing Whistles says:

            It has always been that it is those at the top of a corrupted communist or capitalist system – who are always the last to put their hands up.

            Note I stated ‘corrupted’ system – it matters not a jot whether it is left or right. When there are ‘no checks and balances’ atop it implodes and the legals are the worst of all those ‘behind the scenes’ spinning it up.

            ju.dicial t.yranny

            Now who’s this J*w Ellery feller [MOS FPg] who the lib dims are gonna tax – has he stolen all the gold and have the lib dims signed their own death warrant?

            Like

        • 278
          Rex at No.24 says:

          Shep, your parting shot nails it. An alarmingly high number of programmed
          dullards still watch and believe mainstream TV news, even if newspaper sales are falling.

          Like

      • 207
        Anonymous says:

        No, no, no.

        We Britons are simply not good enough for the Liblabcon.

        We need to be replaced!

        Like

  29. 84
    0-win Jones says:

    Care to see my wrist-spin? My googlies ae a bit special.

    Like

  30. 85
    Owin Jones says:

    Guido Fawkes lights up our world……..mine.

    Like

  31. 90
    Margaret Moran says:

    Looks like Nads has done one fiddle too many. Time to start getting “depressed”.

    Like

  32. 98
    Rusty Dave says:

    Les Ebdon has just reminded me to emphasise that all privately-educated Indian students are welcome in UK universities. Only their British counterparts will be hobbled.

    Like

  33. 100
    MIKE OCKITCH says:

    Dave said this morning

    “It was just over 100 years ago that the first load of Palmolive soap bars left Liverpool docks bound for India”

    Later on this afternoon they will be placing a follow up order for some more

    Like

  34. 116
    Casual Observer says:

    More wonderful news from the economic miracle that is the UK:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/9876275/Incomes-squeeze-dashes-optimism.html

    The real reason why there is less money being spent is likely more because people are paying down existing debts, preparing for proposed tax rises, and dealing with recent tax rises. This of course ignores the fact that money supply in the real economy is being reduced at a time when inflation is ticking up for consumer items, especially food.

    Meat purchases may understandably be down.

    Economists being surprised demonstrate just how worthless the current lot are. Surprise indicates that they have no explanation or forewarning that this was going to happen, which certainly does raise the question as to what value a lot of them add.

    Like

    • 120
      Residing in 96.99% white Merseyside says:

      I’m still spending, especially on Amazon. I’ve got three parcels on the way.

      Like

      • 136
        Universal Hiss says:

        & I’ve just closed my Amazon account siting vile employment practices,the dreadful treatment of publishers & authors & tax avoidance.

        Like

    • 132
      Universal Hiss says:

      I’m probably being over simplistic but isn’t most of this countries woes derived from the overheated cost of housing in this country?

      My daughter will have no chance of buying a property until both sets of grandparents die. Meanwhile she is just burning fifty pound notes every month renting one room in a reasonable flat.

      I know it was a wonderful middle class brag around millions of dinner tables about how clever the housing bubble was & how much my house is worth until the shit hit the fan with their struggling adult children who have been excluded from home owning.

      Rents are silly in most cities where there is work, so it’s impossible to save.

      Housing benefit costs keep rising paid to low earning tax payers & the unemployed thanks to the insane policies of Brown.

      It did start in America with lunatic lending by banks,instigated by Bill Clinton as a vote buyer.Fanny & Freddy fucks with funny money.

      What to do? How to solve?

      Like

      • 144
        silly old buffer's advice bureau says:

        move into the shed and giver her your gaff

        Like

        • 155
          Universal Hiss says:

          I would do but although I live in a beautiful village there is not one job to support her.

          She could go on benefits & leech off the state. I’m sure you could put your hand deeper in your pocket to help.

          Perhaps that’s the answer. We as a family could all be self employed selling the Big Issue.

          Like

      • 152

        My answer is not to everyone’s taste. But it is incredibly effective. Emigrate. One can always return. Other than on a strictly temporary basis, I shall not.

        And before some carper starts, I shall not be availing myself of the NHS. Much better exists.

        Like

        • 171
          Universal Hiss says:

          When my daughter finishes her M.A. that is my advice to her.

          Sadly it’s a little late for me & I have little money.I do have a cunning plan for the near future though!

          Like

      • 153
        Casual Observer says:

        The quick way of fixing: Raise interest rates to about 10% for 6-9 months.

        That will kill all the unsustainable debts out there, put a lot of housing back on the market at reduced prices, and get savings accounts back to where they should be.

        At the same time, establish a government back fixed rate lender, similar to mac / mae in the US to issue home loans to first time buyers at reasonable rate (4%) with at least 20% initial capital and only lending up to 3 times their average annual salary calculated over two years. Set these loans to run between 10 and 20 years, transferable to private sector for a notional fee.

        Government should also acquire distressed stock which is not selling as social housing for rent to those who do not qualify for commercial bank / building society mortgages or scheme such as above. Cut direct housing benefit payments to private landlords also.

        That would have a lot of other effects on the economy, but would clean out the zombies which are currently killing it at present, and help get the next generation on the housing ladder in a sustainable way. Assuming of course no repeat of the credit bubble conditions which came in with Blair back in 1997.

        Like

        • 165
          Universal Hiss says:

          but wouldn’t that leave a couple of million homeowners defaulting on their mortgages & evictions at a rate we have never seen?

          It would certainly bring a much needed correction in the housing market but at an terrible price to people “trying to do the right thing”.

          I can’t see an easy answer. I notice banks have been lending a little but still a considerable amount on buy to lets. I wonder who these buy to letters are.The return for a decent landlord is quite low.High if you are banking on 5 immigrants to a room,with a shed for the overspill. Perhaps they are anticipating a surge in new arrivals next year?

          Like

          • Casual Observer says:

            Yes. But with that many evictions, how would it be done ? In theory people could be put on the street, in practice it would not happen.

            It would be more cost efficient to just put through a massive haircut on debt, and part nationalize some of it. A lot of debts wracked up were odious and should be born by the industry in any case.

            If one looks to !celand and the US though, a lot of people go through pain, yes, but it doesn’t actually last that long. Those who go through the worst pain are living in a bubble induced artificial reality in any case. That is why the longer the real correction is deferred the worst it will be for them.

            Where the economy is right now is zombie territory and that is where it will stay until the next major shock comes a long. It is perhaps better to initiate that shock and control it yourself rather than respond to events abroad as happened last time.

            If the current status quo is left much longer, the negative impact on the productive side of the economy will likely put the next generation in the situation where house prices are numerically more affordable, but there are no quality jobs left against which a mortgage can be secured.

            ie. No change from the present, and living in the UK becomes primarily rented from private landlords. A somewhat feudal arrangement and quite common across the rest of Europe.

            That situation is fine if the perception that rent money is wasted money is changed, and unless you wish to be a landlord, property is no longer regarded as an investment.

            This does undo the home ownership revolution which started back in the 70s, and perhaps that was Labours real objective in the UK when the credit bubble was inflated.

            Like

      • 162
        Point of Information says:

        Mae / Mac got burned in the housing fiasco a bit, but they did not lend into it: Blame does not lay there.

        To understand what happened in the US: It was a fraud.

        Lehman’s ran out of prime mortgage folk. They had figured out how to securitise. Good business. How to get more prime mortgages to securitize ?

        Easy: Make the sub-prime, prime.

        How do you do that ?

        In the securities, just do some slight of hands to make them look good on paper and suckers in investors.

        For the lenders, just need to create a situation which allows banks to lend to people they shouldn’t.

        Solution: Create an insurance product for a loan which makes lending risk free for a bank. This is what credit default swaps are all about: The bank swaps the risk of lending to a loser with an insurance firm, like A.I.G. Both insurance / bank see $ profit, loser gets a mortgage.

        So: Lehman create this new product, sell it. It appears to work. Then it gets applied to mortgages.

        All sub-prime is now prime. In a lot of cases, mortgages were handed over as cash which simply disappeared.

        Combined with lax regulation and total corruption top to bottom in the mortgage industry of America, it is now possible for unemployed guy in deep south Alabama, with only a string vest, to get a $250k mortgage to buy a shed and that is a prime mortgage.

        NB: People who got dragged into this on the investment side were rather foolish as no one stopped to ask: Is payment of the mortgages truly guaranteed ?

        Answer: No. In the US, if you return the keys to your bank they cannot continue to pursue you for mortgage debt. Will hurt your credit score, but the bank will end up with a trashed property which will cost them to demolish or resell (whichever is cheaper).

        This summarizes with humour:

        Like

        • 170
          Universal Hiss says:

          Thank-you for that. I was lazy in my posting. However the result was still the same. Miss selling by banks allowed by the state.They were let off the leash & savaged all in their path. Top to bottom corruption & it’s still going on.

          Like

          • Point of Information says:

            No worries U.H. In the US, given what happened to Lehmans / Bear etc. Clinton / Bush didn’t realize exactly what effect Greenspan’s low rate policy was having. The overriding political concern at the time was repair of the S+L fiasco from the 80s.

            One would expect that they were led to believe that switching over to variable rate mortgages etc. would lead to a new ‘thrifts’ (US version of building societies which were decimated in the S+L crisis of the 80s) emerging.

            They should have figured out what was really going on after LTCM died.

            Like

          • Blowing Whistles says:

            And I dare say:- Could the 1986 Bankruptcy Act – be illegal and contrary to the common law?

            Like

        • 175
          Blowing Whistles says:

          One thing that many people might wish to investigate is the 1986 Bankruptcy Act – and its surreptitious ‘add on’ The Enterprise Act of 2002.

          All bankruptcies in the UK since the 1986 Act have been ‘unlawful’.

          Like

        • 179
          CarryHole is a stupendous Hunt says:

          Not really.

          The fraud kept it going longer, but it wouldn’t matter.

          Credit Volume lowers the costs of credit…

          When the state lowers the cost of credit below the rate of risk then systematic bankruptcy is assured.

          Why does the state need credit to increase? Because it masks the damage done to comparative advantage (money velocity) by taxes on incomes.

          Like

        • 191

          @PoI

          You are in the main correct here apart from a minor position, with major repercussions, on the issue of motive. I speak as one who witnessed this phenomenon at first hand.

          As business became more competitive, following the long period of growth enabled after the fall of the Berlin Wall, good quality borrowers were able to extract finer rated deals from the lenders.

          Eventually, spurred on in our case by the effective dismantling of regulation, the lenders started to say you cannot make a good profit from the good payers, let us lend more to the poorly rated.

          All manner of major players said that to me at the time. I responded that no improved yield would compensate from an inability to collect. My advice fell upon deaf ears, an attitude I found unbelievable.

          Imagine if you will a long journey in which there is a critical junction where, if you take the wrong road, you will be travelling further away from your intended destination, due perhaps to an intervening mountain range or sea. In this situation, after they took the wrong turning, they just put their feet down harder upon their accelerator pedals!

          Every person who is reading this blog will know the outcome, from whichever part of the political spectrum they occupy.

          So blame Gordon Brown for his part in our train crash. That is right. But that does not absolve those who rushed headlong into this mess. Following Nuremberg convention, I was just following the market just does not wash.

          Like

          • Point of Information says:

            @SC: I caught the tail end of the bubble, on the inside. I think you cashed out at the right time from what have read of your other posts before.

            The aspect of regulation and easy availability of cheap credit were the main catalysts that allowed the good business sense you speak of (and which I fully endorse) to be replaced with fraud.

            Can blame brown for total de-reg in 1997, and also in the UK I think the replacement of Bo.E target with inflation rather than government setting interest rates also played a role.

            Brown and the US deregulation was not purely politically motivated, or his idea. That came in from a distortion of recommendations (notably published by CATO and some other think tanks) which advocated that less regulation was a way to help S+L recovery faster and prevent it happening again moving forward.

            Of course the opposite, as was originally put forward by Kane, would have been correct. Simplified and cheaper regulation yes, but much more tightly enforced with the obvious holes for fraud as noted in the 80s problem closed.

            Like

          • Universal Hiss says:

            There must have been more like you but not enough.

            From what I understand is very few actually understood the instruments they were using & seemed to care less while all the money was rolling in.A collective hysteria we see playing out in the N.H.S.,EU & indeed all political parties.Too big to fail & too stupid to reform.

            As POI has stated perhaps the unthinkable should happen & fail they must.

            Like

          • Point of Information says:

            It is not a case of the unthinkable happening, but rather capitalism being allowed to function as it inevitably will.

            Bankruptcy is capitalism’s way of stripping out inefficient and wasteful agents in the economy, allowing new growth to emerge if there is demand. That is fundamental to the business cycle dynamic.

            Other than iffy socialist and political motivations at present, one reason this has been perverted is that it perhaps would affect the closed funds, and the principal beneficiaries of those would be hit very hard.

            See Clive Cowdery and his Reformation activities with consolidating UK life insurance market in early 2000′s to get an idea. Zombie funds worked back then: They are discredited now, but what was done cannot be reversed.

            Like

          • Point of Information says:

            It is not a case of the unthinkable happening, but rather capitalism being allowed to function as it inevitably will.

            B’nkruptcy is capitalism’s way of stripping out inefficient and wasteful agents in the economy, allowing new growth to emerge if there is demand. That is fundamental to the business cycle dynamic.

            Other than iffy socialist and political motivations at present, one reason this has been perverted is that it perhaps would affect the closed funds, and the principal beneficiaries of those would be hit very hard.

            See Cl!ve C0wdery and his activities with consolidating UK life insurance market in early 2000′s to get an idea. Zombie funds worked back then: They are discredited now, but what was done cannot be reversed.

            Like

          • @PoI

            The bubble has not actually burst properly as you allude to. It has more marked time.

            Jeffersonian democracy was a strange bird that had many inbuilt contradictions. CATO have encouraged a whole number of situations which would have flown in the face of Jeffersonianism including an even greater concentration of wealth.

            My own position hardly figures in the scheme of things except to say that I did not see a return to any normality in which my experience could be of use, within my remaining expectancy of working life. So there was a way in which facing facts made it an easier decision for me than if I had been younger, had children still at school or a whole lot of other similarly binding circumstances.

            @UH
            You are quite right except that my analogy of taking the wrong turning and then accelerating has in some ways become even more problematic. A number of my friends with brighter children have seen their kids go off to find better opportunities abroad, mostly in the Gulf but also in India and Chіna. Your advice to your daughter is good. It is amazing how a different perspective can bring about a change in your perceptions of priorities. Our minds need to be expanded, not contracted, in order to survive. Good luck to her and you.

            Like

          • Casual Observer says:

            @SC: I did not mean to say the bubble has burst.

            Part of it has. The bulk of it is being propped up by smoke / mirrors and the tax payer.

            It needs to burst, and the next big rip will likely be in the sovereign debt markets fairly soon.

            Looking at who funds CATO explains where some of their agenda’s come from. Not knocking them, but no think-tank is perfect and like media they have a bias dictated to some degree by the paymasters.

            It is still strange that government in the US and UK actually went along with what they said. They could see a way of making $ themselves, and some likely did it for deeper ideological reasons.

            No one is off the hook though.

            2007 was when the bubble stopped inflated and lost a bit of air. Since then it has been deflating more slowly, but that situation will be changed by new economic events coming down the pipe.

            No one has mentioned the Y3n carry trade here either. That rate differential was the primary pump used to inflate, followed by the Fed when that stopped.

            Like

          • @CO

            Sorry CO. I just realised with horror, upon rereading, how my words were capable of misconstruction. My not act solely on the burst and not to your alluding to it. Glad to put that right asap!

            As you say, no one is off the hook, however splendid in isolation they may think themselves.

            Agree about the carry trade too. Any sane person who sees something like that must know there is something wrong. If I had been sufficiently organised so as to take advantage of it though? Hard call!

            Like

      • 176
        CarryHole is a stupendous Hunt says:

        Tax the unimproved value of Land (and not tax incomes) is what Adam Smith and David Ricardo would advise.

        Like

  35. 117
    Grimy Miner says:

    He runs like a mincer.
    “Chase me, chase me” (c) Duncan Norvelle

    Like

  36. 119
    Residing in 96.99% white Merseyside says:

    Give credit where credit is due, our Dave is quite good on the international stage.

    Like

  37. 126
    (I don't need no doctor) says:

    Has the labour coward Andy Burnham resigned yet.

    Like

  38. 134
    Ed Miliband discussing with Ed Balls labour's major policies says:

    Do you think anyone noticed that we stole the lib-dem mansion tax policy?

    Like

  39. 138
    dennis pennis says:

    roses are red
    violets are blue
    my birds hubby
    gonna date bubby

    Like

  40. 145
    Chav Slappers R Us says:

    I’ve got 11 kids and I’ve no idea where the fathers are. I want the council to build me a house big enough to live in comfort. Vote Labour!

    Like

  41. 148
    Tom Watson says:

    Proof that News International have Operation Ore list. Why didn’t Sunday Times name VIP p*edophiles? http://spotlightonabuse.wordpress.com/2013/02/09/city-bosses-named-on-child-porn-list-26-01-2003/

    Like

    • 164
      Justice says:

      Whatever your motive Tom keep going. The children deserve some justice.

      Like

      • 168
        Blowing Whistles says:

        He has been smeared by many – from all political sides – NOW WHY WOULD THAT BE?

        Murdoch & Co as I have stated previously – have been using the Ore info to bend and shape the political picture for their own financial ends – Try for ONE EXAMPLE the Ppremier league / skyhigh monies that have gone into the murdochcoffers – most of it offshore!

        Like

    • 185
      Point of Information says:

      There were a lot of problems with operation Ore.

      Stolen identities being one of them. A lot of regular people who were arrested and imprisoned had their convictions overturned when it was later verified that they were victims of mistaken identity.

      People have a perception that Ore was perfect etc. but it was deeply flawed from an evidence point of view.

      However, unless there have been full and proper investigations of all in the public eye who were on that list then what has happened since does smell very strongly of cover up.

      Like

      • 234
        Blowing Whistles says:

        There was a clique of 400 in the list – they were the captains of the business, legal and political world. We had a Labour government at the time. favours and horsetrading behind the scenes were the order of the day. Bliar was Murdoch’s puppet. Funny how no ‘competition commission’ investigation was ever raised against sky B plurality or that at its inception ofcom dared to haul in murdoch … all very not democratic I would say. What goes around comes around.

        Ed Richards / Richard Scudamore / Leighton & Crozier / The Horsman book / Morgan Grenfell / TNT / Ordinto a tax vehicle in the Caymans etc…

        Like

        • 246
          Point of Information says:

          One does wonder if timing was an issue as well.

          Statute of limitations etc.

          Sav!le stuff coming out could be a smoke screen for this in a way. Sort of devalues Rupee’s hand if those are some of the cards held, but then there are others who have that list as well. Thinking governments, and perhaps the Wikileak lads.

          Like

  42. 151
    Ed Balls(Chancellor Of The Exchequer Designate) says:

    Crumbling Global Economy Passes Point of No Return –

    http://BlackListedNews.com

    http://www.blacklistednews.com/Crumbling_Global_Economy_Passes_Point_of_No_Return/24285/0/0/0/Y/M.html?morestories=obinsite

    Like

  43. 160
    Vicky Pryce says:

    I wish the jury would hurry up.

    Newsnight needs my wise words

    Like

  44. 163
    Saffron says:

    So Wavy Davy No Balls is now in india with his business chums trying to sweet talk them into giving us a lifeline.
    He talks about open house to fastrack students to our wonderful universities who in a lot of cases are providing crap degrees which are not marketable in the real world.
    Davy boy IMHO needs to wake up and smell the coffee:-
    1) Take us out of the corrupt EUSSR.
    2) Stop the international aid fraud.
    3) Stop the Lib/Green arseholes wind farm schemes that is costing us plenty.
    4)Get to grips with the levels of benefit seeking morons who are entering this land and ripping us off.
    5)Reduce government spending off the backs of taxpayers,I recollect a bonfire of quangoes which has not happened.
    6) Re the rogue NHS trusts killing people,exactly who will face the law over this.
    7)MP,s are still in the trough,what are you going to do about this.
    8)Cammoron,when are you going to grow a pair and become A REAL CONSERVATIVE.
    9) The opposition both Lab and Libdumbs are crap and the Cons make no headway,why is this.

    Like

  45. 180
    A non-Indian Computer Programmer says:

    I’m so glad he’s over there giving away our English jobs.

    Like

    • 188
      Blowing Whistles says:

      I have had such fun for the past 5 or so years – initially being nice to all them call centre operatives in India (A different jurisdiction) to in the end fuck off – with their trying to chase me for English Corporate ‘false’ Bank debts – even told the mongs from MBNA where to stick their ‘false’ debts too.

      Like

  46. 184
    Andy Bumhum says:

    It’s been a great week for burying bad news. Oooops ! Did I say ‘burying’ ?

    Like

    • 190
      Blowing Whistles says:

      When all them ‘socialist dupes ‘n fools’ catch up with your likes – when they work out how you’ve ripped them all off – you aint gonna get protection – not even from the pigs.

      Like

      • 196
        Not Blowing Whistles says:

        With size and scope of what went on, remember that even Clwyd was caught out in this as victim, how many families of those in the police and even secret services have been affected ?

        Burnham is a walking corpse.

        Like

  47. 192
    Guido Fawkes says:

    Guido Fawkes: We are going to find Owen Jones a hubby.

    Like

  48. 198
    P l e b says:

    Whatever happened to Toxic Taffy and his YouTube videos?

    Like

  49. 204
    P l e b says:

    “Nuclear power: ministers offer reactor deal until 2050

    Energy firms may get 40-year backing after government U-turn on subsidies”

    Like

  50. 206
    Joss Ayinglike says:

    Ignore the imbecilic, tree-hugging, woolly-hatted, woolly-headed FibDems like Ed Davy and let’s get fracking.

    Like

    • 215
      Ed Dafty, LimpDim MP, Climate Change Chieftain says:

      Shut up ! We’re LibDems; tax is what we’re about, now pay up.

      Like

    • 220
      Universal Hiss says:

      I drove around rural Aberdeenshire today.About 100 mile trip. A beautiful sunny calm day. Wonderful scenery scarred by the many wind turbines.

      None moved. All were taking electricity from the grid to oil their bearings. Not one watt produced but a visual blight on the landscape.Of course we had gales for two weeks on & off before today & they produced not a watt then. Too windy.

      Aberdeenshire council has the crowing glory of allowing more of these useless machines per square mile than anywhere else in the U.K.

      So if above article counts these as reserves……don’t.

      Like

      • 241

        Not so much a whit of a watt.

        Love Inverurie and its surrounds, presumably all blighted now?

        Like

        • 244
          Universal Hiss says:

          Cat,were you watching me? I did indeed go to Inverurie.

          Not too bad in that area. Mither Tap still unspoilt.

          Like

          • Cat sees everything, even in the dark. :-)

            I was speaking to someone from there during the last week. But I stayed there in the 90s and explored everywhere.

            Just to explain, as if it were ever needed, that I have many Scottish friends and spent three decades going to all parts of it including all the inhabited islands, save Colonsay, which I am hoping to see this year. But I am occasionally very rude towards the politicos on here. It is a distinction I am quite at ease with and hope you are too.

            Like

      • 247
        Another Engineer says:

        The Monadliath hills are the latest target. 3 monstrous proposals in wild land. One proposes 65km of new tracks to be bulldozed across the hills.

        The council has rejected them but no doubt Eck will wave them through.

        Its a disaster for anyone that doesn’t want to see the industrialisation of the mountains, and then to add insult to injury, have the lights go out.

        Like

        • 251

          Hi AE. Not seen you on here for a while.

          What an intrusion upon the Cairngorms. Not been there since the late 90s. Some of the most unspoiled parts of the Highlands. Do you holiday there as you come from rather further down, if I remember correctly?

          Like

          • Another Engineer says:

            Yes, indeed – I’m one of these people that should be stopped from killing myself on wintry hills, so that I can go on the LCP instead.

            The Cairngorm national park have objected to the proposals, too, but we’ll see what happens.

            The bulk of the SNP are urbanites, just like the parties in London, so they don’t seem to care. How long before the Highlands and Islands want independence from Edinburgh?

            Like

          • Ha! What I have always argued in your last sentence!

            Like

  51. 210
    BBC News reporters. Long may your strike last. says:

    I wish the BBC journos would go on permanent strike.

    It’s been a first class neutral news service today. That’s how the BBC should do it.

    Like

  52. 217
  53. 218
    Andy Bumhum says:

    Like

  54. 228
    Anonymous says:

    I hope Cameron will tell the Indian PM that a Trident boat will unilaterally disarm itself in the direction of Indian callcentres if they don’t stop pestering the UK with Hinglish calls about PPI or personal injury claims or silent calls.

    Like

  55. 236
    ████ ' changed my tune ' Hoon says:

    Watch that Nick Clegg: he’s a typical LibDem.

    Like

  56. 264
    Blind Pugh says:

    Some twat on Sky News has just congratulated Cameron on his forward defensive stroke .

    For fucks sake there is a country mile between the bat and his leg .

    If I played a shot like that at school the master would have dropped me on the spot .

    Like

  57. 266
    The Military Government of Mali says:

    Looking at that photo you would not think that that man could possibly have led a Government which is responsible for infiltrating the European food chain with deadly bute .

    Let us all hope and pray that when he gets back from India he is arrested and taken to the Hague to stand trial in 2026.

    Like

  58. 267
    Bluebottle says:

    Why has my Prime Minister gone to India and dressed up as a black shirt ?

    Like

    • 268
      Golly says:

      I think M rCameron needs to be very careful .

      For a Christmas panto I dressed up as a black and white minstrel and ended up in a Police cell .

      Like

  59. 270
    Long John Silver's parrot says:

    A little girl pegged Cameron’s stump back.

    Like


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Find out more about PLMR AD-MS


Boris on his fellow Islingtonista Emily Thornberry:

“It was an entirely run-of-the-mill English townscape, with some straightforward words to go with it. There was no obvious insult, no abuse, no overt sneering. She might have got away with it entirely, had some alert blogger not spotted it. He instantly detected the coded message that Emily Thornberry was sending to all her right-on, bien-pensant, Labour-luvvie friends in Islington, or wherever else it is that they follow her on Twitter.”



Left on Left says:

The lefties are attacking because the panellist is a millionaire and lives in a London home worth upwards of two million. Someone had best tell them he’s called Ed Miliband.


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