November 24th, 2011

Time for Sadiq Khan to Come Clean Once and For All

Today is the day that the case of Babar Ahmed will be debated in Westminster Hall after another e-petition hit the mark. The terror suspect is fighting extradition to the States:

“US prosecutors allege he was a global fundraiser for extremists in Afghanistan and Chechnya, through a website operated from south London but technically based in the US. He is also accused of having obtained information about US Navy ships and their movements in the Gulf.”

There are pretty good grounds for a trial here in the UK given he was based here, but before that can even be considered his links to Labour’s Shadow Justice Minister Sadiq Khan, who is expected to speak in the debate today, need to be properly explained. There have been seven years of squirming and story changing that could be rectified today. Khan has given no less than three conflicting accounts, on the record, about the relationship. Which one was the truth remains to be seen…

Ahmad came to prominence when it was revealed that his meetings with his old friend Sadiq Khan were bugged by the spooks. The first time the Shadow Justice Secretary went to visit Ahmad was as “a friend” in 2004 and he went again in 2005.  Around the same time the story about Khan’s relationship with Ahmad broke in 2008, a page mysteriously disappeared from Khan’s website. A cached version of what he wrote in June 2006 is still available though. Crucially it stated “I have known Babar Ahmad for over fifteen years. We both grew up in Tooting.” But that isn’t what he told the House…

On July 12, 2006, a month after writing on his website that he had known Ahmad for 15 years, Khan told a House of Commons debate on the UK-US extradition treaty “Babar Ahmad is of a similar age to me and, like me, he was born and raised in Tooting. I have known him on and off for the past 12 or 13 years.” How long is it exactly Sadiq?

And that’s not the only inconsistency. Khan claimed he was visiting Ahmad in jail in his capacity as a “friend” and the Sir Christopher Rose Report into why Khan was bugged on those visits concluded that he made no effort to reveal to prison security that he was an MP.  Fast forward to 2008 and the bugging story breaks. Khan is under fire and the Prime Minister’s Official Spokesman is put in an awkward spot where he quite clearly does not defend him:

“Asked if the Prime Minister was happy that a Minister of the Crown had close ties, all be it professional, with people connected to the 9/11 attacks and organisations that some believed should be banned, the PMS replied that Mr Khan was a Whip, and therefore part of the Government. In this case he was acting as a constituency MP in relation to, as we understood it, somebody he had known since childhood.”

The added detail is the most interesting – it was stated he was “acting as a constituency MP”. So Gordon Brown’s spokesman and Babar Ahmad’s even own sister Sara have claimed that Khan and Babar were friends since their childhood. However Khan told constituents in 2006 that he had only known him for a fifteen years and told Parliament that it was even less time. But what did he tell the prison authorities?

When he was filling out an application to visit Babar Ahmad in 2005 Khan told the prison that he had known Ahmad “since they were 12 or 13 years old; they were locals and attended the same mosque”. That’s not what he told Parliament… 

If it was an honest mistake then today is the perfect opportunity to clear it up and have Hansard corrected, because Khan clearly mislead the House of Commons. Perhaps he could also explain the deliberate removal of details of his relationship with Ahmad from his own website.  A more pertinent Member of the House might like to ask Mr Khan during the debate today a couple of questions that could settle this once and for all:

  • Why are there three versions of the story? Given Khan did not tell the prison authorities he was an MP when visiting Ahmad in 2005, why was the PMOS briefed, presumably by Khan himself, that he was there on parliamentary business?
  • Why did Khan try to downplay the extent of his friendship with Ahmad in 2006 only to have the truth revealed by Sir Christopher Rose, Sara Ahmad and the PMOS in 2008?
  • Does he have any further connection to Ahmad, or his family, be it by blood or marriage, that has not yet been declared publicly?

Will today finally be the day we get some answers?


123 Comments

  1. 1
    Billy Bowden is the greatest umpire ever ! says:

    A conflict of intrest?

    Is Barbar a union member?

    Like

    • 2
      Anonymous says:

      The Office for National Statistics said that net migration in 2010 was 252,000 – the highest calendar year figure on record.

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/immigration/8912005/Migration-in-2010-at-record-high.html

      Like

      • 5
        Handycock (Teen Fondler) says:

        And a good thing too. If it wasn’t for mass immigration and thick students, I would never get elected. What a disaster that would be. No much sex troughing at taxpayer’s expense. Boaz.

        Like

      • 23
        Rage Against the Political Elite says:

        Cmon Guido. What is this propaganda. Who really blew up the twin towers? Building 7. I know the Yanks have a higher proportion of thick people and immigrants who really dont give a f–k, and believe the State Fiction Story.

        Please give us Brits a bit more respect, and especially followers of this blog.

        Like

        • 27
          Rage Against the Political Elite says:

          CUI BONO

          Like

        • 70
          Rage Against the Political Elite says:

          No you daft C–t, I am just educating people about the World that they are taught nothing about. Shame about the level of your education. I am not talking about your GCSE qualifications.

          Like

          • Rage Against the Political Elite says:

            I should have said I am trying to give you an education but I suppose you are so full of S–t that you cant take anything in.

            Hows your Phoney Drug War going????

            Like

          • Sungei Patani says:

            It is much more likely that you are trying to educate people about what goes on in your paranoid mind which is clearly distorted by unsubstantiated conspiracy theories.

            You spout loads of rubbish and when challenged are quite unable to provide any proof or even a coherent argument in support. You were even foolish enough to say that the IRA was part of Military Intelligence.

            Like

          • Alexis Kornershop says:

            Delusional. On the plus side, Bacofoil sales have never been so healthy.

            Like

          • Rage Against the Political Elite says:

            All you State sponsored Wan—s have’nt worked it out yet have you. The economy is tanking due to your phoney Wars. Once the economy is totally fuc–d, Who do you think is going to pay your pension. Ha Ha Ha.
            You had better get used to eating turnip.

            Like

          • Rage Against the Political Elite says:

            OSA

            Like

          • Rage Against the Political Elite says:

            If you supply the hardware and the man power, which part of the IRA is not part of your organisation you thick c–t.

            http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/congress-probes-ios-revelations-on-ira-link-to-iraq-470480.html

            Like

          • Sungei Patani says:

            If you actually look at the numbers (these are facts which I know you have trouble with) far more is spent in the UK on welfare including the Old Age Pension than is spent on the Defence budget.

            If anything will bankrupt us it is the bloated welfare budget not expenditure on Defence which is at the lowest level as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product for many years.

            Like

          • Rage Against the Political Elite says:

            Operations outside of the area of economic interest have a negative effect. Bombs have No commercial benefit once deployed, Its nothing like the Cash pumped into the Welfare state which the State recover again in TAX. How many on Welfare SMOKE, DRINK.
            Work it out you really do need a lesson in economics.
            Let me put it simply. War is like giving your economy a slow puncture.
            The Phoney Drug War is propping up a Police State and spiriting Billions out of the economy in the illegal trade of narcotics.
            The State cant have it all and have to make some decisions soon otherwise you will be eating turnips

            Like

          • Sungei Patani says:

            Oh dear what a silly billy. The actual costs of the armaments used in the recent conflicts is a very small proportion of the Defence Budget which is predominantly paying the salaries of our servicemen and the civil servants that support them. And do you know what? They all pay tax as well.

            In the case of the armaments themselves, as in all manufactured products, the bulk of the costs is in paying the wages of those who make them who surprise, surprise also pay tax.

            The amount expended on munitions used during these conflicts is trivial compared to the foreign aid budget which is, by definition, predominately spent overseas which has a much bigger drag on our economy than munitions expenditure – you do seem to be aiming at the wrong target.

            Could it be that your thought process is slightly distorted by these drugs you are continually mentioning?

            Like

      • 115
        Sungei Patani says:

        Grossly excessive. The last fling of the discredited Labour government.

        Like

    • 4
      Anonymous says:

      Lord Chadlington, the chief executive of the Huntsworth Group, which owns a number of public affairs firms, bought the house and land neighbouring Mr Cameron’s constituency home for £715,000. The Conservative peer then sold Mr Cameron the land for £137,000, while the house appears to be empty. The disclosure will raise concerns about Lord Chadlington’s links with Mr Cameron.

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/david-cameron/8911520/David-Cameron-should-have-declared-land-deal-with-party-donor-says-former-watchdog.html

      Like

    • 29
      King of the Jungle says:

      I thought he was an elephant.

      Like

    • 90
      Selohesra says:

      The dishonourable member for Tooting
      Has friends keen on murder & looting
      He’s conceited and smug
      But deep down a thug
      Sadiq needs taking out and shooting

      Like

  2. 3
    Billy Bowden is the greatest umpire ever ! says:

    Can anyone give a number of Mps that do not use thier offices and postion to enrich themselves or thier mates?

    Like

    • 7
      Handycock No1 Trougher in Parliament says:

      Grow up and live in the real world Billy.

      Like

    • 26
      Engineer says:

      In any group of 650 human beings, some will have inflexible integrity, some will make mistakes, some will be easily led, some will have an eye for an opportunity, and some will be outright wrong ‘uns. You’d hope that the selection process would skew the chances in favour of the first two, but it can’t be guaranteed. By the nature of things, you won’t hear much about the good ‘uns – they’ll just get on with the job.

      Human nature is what it is, and it won’t change.

      Like

      • 54
        Sungei Patani says:

        What a sensible statement – so different from the usual hyperbole that spoils this blog.

        Like

      • 79
        Mike Hunt says:

        Mine is in the first category.

        Like

      • 86
        Geoff, England says:

        There’s probably a higher number of people in the negative categories in the House of Commons than you’d find in any other random group of 650 individuals. I guess the political system more or less guarantees that.

        Like

        • 116
          CYNICAL OLD MAN says:

          As many of the members of the House of Commons are lawyers, probably the most corrupt of professions judging by the large number who receive gaol sentences, it’s hardly surprising that corruption and wrongdoing is endemic in that place.

          Like

      • 91
        The Borg says:

        Its important to remember that MPs are not a random group of 650 people but rather are a group of people who have been chosen initially by a selection process which spews out particular types who have much in common and are not as diverse as your observations suggest.

        Like

      • 98
        gildedtumbril says:

        In any 650 human beings…Ballox! They are not 650 human beings. They are all shysters, charlatans, scumbags, scalliwags and scoundrels. “inflexible integrity”, ballox. If, by some godamned miracle, one with integrity entered the house of conmen they would be corrupted in minutes. As for the bastards in the euphemistically titled upper house, they are even worse. They have proved their mendacity and Machiavellian malfeasance many times over.
        To put it in a nutshell, they are all bent bastards, without exception.
        Sic transit gloria mundi. (I think it means don’t catch a bendy bus on a monday)

        Like

        • 107
          Descartes says:

          I said in the 19th Century.

          ‘Any person putting themselves forward for service in political life, should be banned from it, on the basis that they have put themselves forward.’

          As true today as it was then. Eveidence: Handycock, Laws, Huhne, Uddin and the rest of the crooked twats.

          Like

    • 119
      RevThe Rev.Timothy Farthing says:

      You need to read a little history of political philisophy, you’ll soon discover the notion of public service for greater good of society has never been the norm. It was Plato (with influence from Socrates) who first outlined the concept of the ruling elite using their position not for their own gain but for the gain of the whole society, this did not mean some socialist utopia of equality the differences of wealth, power and ability would in fact be quite rigid within proposed political structures. But the notion that the elite would reluctantly accept power and only use it for the good of the society and indeeed would step down from it once they had done their duty is Plato’s.

      We live in an age that is actually pre Platonic in that the elite now see only the need to hold office to further their own agenda, in effect we are back in the times of Ancient Barbaric Kingdoms in this respect. There is no notion of not accepting power, wealth, indeed anything they fancy from the offices that our elite hold. The undue influence of lobbyists is the clearest single example of the decline of Democracy and this will continue till it is ended in all but name i would guess mid 21st Century from current trends.

      Thank God I will have long passed on by then.

      Like

  3. 6
    Jimmy says:

    Good to see the “libertarian” angle on this one. And fair point, how are MI5 supposed to bug MPs effectively if they won’t even identify themselves?

    Like

  4. 8
    Sadsick Kunt says:

    Cucumber or onion raita?

    Like

  5. 9
    EdMiliband says:

    I will apologithe to the houthe today. Tomorrow I will thay thorry to the garage. He thould follow my example

    Like

  6. 10
    Peter Grimes says:

    “Will today finally be the day we get some answers?”

    Do me a favour! What do you think?

    The slimy ZaNuLieBor git will do as they all do, and fudge and prevaricate!

    Like

  7. 11
    Airey Belvoir says:

    Dodgy Muslim knows other dodgy Muslim shock. Not one to lose any sleep over, I think.

    Like

    • 59
      Spartacus says:

      just doing what they do best . . . chanting, bombing, sponging off the welfare state . . .

      Like

      • 109
        BBC News: The Acme of Impartial Reportage says:

        So they wish to annihilate Israel, the US, etc, and enslave the rest of the free world. At worst, lovable scoundrels a little highly spirited (cf. 3 Lions), therefore, nothing to see here.

        Like

  8. 13
    Not keen on Keen says:

    I know it’s tradition for all sides of the house to sing the praises of a recently deceased mp regardless of his or her past behaviour but the tributes yesterday to Alan Keen really stuck in the gut. He and his wife were two of the worst troughers in the expenses scandal. And I remember footage of them on election night last year hurling abuse at reporters before running off. I for one won’t miss that tossflap.

    Like

  9. 15
    Anonymous says:

    I think it’s time for you and your blog to be regulated now, you ask too many questions.

    Like

  10. 16
    Billy Blowjob is the greatest fart ever says:

    I am Billy Blowjob and I’ve been posting on this site for 258,963 consecutive hours.

    Like

  11. 18
    Martin Day says:

    The day you get the truth from one of these corrupt, lying, scheming treacherous bastards will never dawn, graft and corruption is in their DNA.

    Like

  12. 19
    Angry of London says:

    I thought we all understood that Liebour love terrorists? Just so long as they’re THEIR terrorists (like Guardian tax evasion, cash for legislation and lying generally).

    Face it, if you can get your nose half way up Gadaffi’s alimentary canal whilst sp_unking all over his son ‘Safe’ with the Walf Miwiband memorial tour (in exchange for ‘donations’ of course) then a bit of bomber infatuation is really rather small beans.

    Like

  13. 20
    EdMiliband says:

    A thhower maketh me clean uthually

    Like

  14. 21
    Sad Dick Cunt says:

    Time to play my ‘card’……

    Like

  15. 22
    Sadsick Kunt says:

    You iz all being well rayshellist! I iz gonna call me mates Trevor Philips and Lee Jasper to use da race card, innit and ting?

    Like

  16. 24
    SK says:

    Like

  17. 25
    Lord Ivorson says:

    BBC were very keen on Keen and sang his praises without any effort to tell us the truth about him.
    Sadiq Khan will only get a mention if he wriggles out of his obvious lies.
    My “media show trial” is proving a fine distraction and plenty of time for Labour and Lib Dems to bury bad news.

    Like

  18. 28
    Cynical-old-bag says:

    Now all this has come to light, I wonder if any of it will be debated, or whether another large tin of whitewash will be bought – on expenses, of course.

    Like

  19. 30
    Lady Boy Yvette says:

    My colleague Shady Khun is as trustworthy as my husband.

    Like

  20. 33
    'Gypsy' Dave Cooper says:

    .

    Like

  21. 34
    Rob says:

    Immigration up under the Conservatives

    British unemployment up under the Conservatives.

    Conservative plans to destroy Englands countryside with “Homes for immigrants” will wipe out rural Conservative MPs.

    Vote UKIP – stop Blue Labour.

    Like

    • 37
      Sophie says:

      +1

      Like

    • 47
      Angry of London says:

      You missed:
      ZIRP maintained
      QE increased
      Borrowing increased
      Inflation increased
      Ludicrous asset prices maintained
      Retail banking STILL not firewalled from casino banking
      Chances of eventual financial collapse now almost certain

      Why vote for Leibour without the benefits? At lease they’d ruin us quickly and we may be able to cart a wheelbarrow of worthless cash out of the ashes. This lot will ruin us slowly whilst ensuring that we have a bucket instead of a wheelbarrow.

      Like

    • 51
      Billy Bowden is the greatest umpire ever ! says:

      Why arent british buisness hiring british workers?

      Answer that then you solve the immigration problem.

      Like

      • 65
        Angry of London says:

        We don’t hire them because they can’t write, spell, add-up, turn up to work or behave in a remotely professional fashion when at work. Blame the education system of the last 13 years. Most young workers are decent people who have been denied basic education about how to behave in the real world.

        The much derided Poles etc. generally speak better English, have a hugely superior work ethic are much more polite and are a credit to the workplace. Go figure.

        Like

        • 94
          Must get a pseudonym one day says:

          It’s far easier to teach the Poles at work to speak English than it is to teach the English chavs how to work.

          Like

        • 108
          Fish says:

          ‘Blame the education system of the last 13 years. Most young workers are decent people who have been denied basic education about how to behave in the real world’

          I agree Mr Angry.

          BBC in the Midlands did a series of interviews at a careers fair earlier this week, including one with a HR Manager of an engineeering company that will be recruiting 200 in the new year (don’t know how this positive news found it’s way onto the beeb!). She went on to say that they want to employ youngsters but they have poor english and maths skills and at school had not been taught to use measuring equipment (rulers actually). Using a rule was quite fundamental in engineering, she said.

          Of course you are not allowed to criticise the education system for fear of upsetting the kids – the very people that the teaching profession have failed.

          Like

        • 114
          Owlett says:

          One reason for that is that Polish education is scrupulous – it’s hard work to get into Uni, even Art college and to enter the latter, you need a number of ‘A’ levels in standard subjects (Maths, etc).

          The Poles have their chavs and lowlife, but they’re not such a problem, nor have they become such a discrete culture of entitlement. The reason being they’re not allocated armies of social workers,etc to ‘understand’ them, and to intercede on their behalf in mining rich seams of welfare. In Poland the scrounger, the layabout, is ‘understood’ only too well.

          Like

      • 81
        Mike Hunt says:

        Because after being educated in today’s schools, they can’t read, write or hold a sensible conversation, despite having GCSEs.

        Let me remind you again which party was in power whilst they were in education?

        Like

    • 52
      Aaron D Highside says:

      They have one brilliantly articulate star in Farage and the rest seem as credible as Lib Dems. Only reason I wouldn’t risk it.

      Like

    • 87
      Nick Clegg says:

      I was doing my best to stop this kind of racism by making a massive issue of race and demanding tokenistic appointments of black people across all industries all over Sky News this morning.

      Like

  22. 35
    Steve Miliband says:

    Would be fun to be a Border Agent for a day

    Like

  23. 40
    Debate says:

    Labour are evil. Discuss.

    Like

    • 50
      Angry of London says:

      There’s not enough white space on the internet. Not enough silicon in the world to store all the bits required. Probably not enough atoms in the universe.

      Like

    • 75
      nell says:

      That’s like saying that militwit will never be PM. These things are a given.

      Like

  24. 43
  25. 44
    Hitting a raw nerve says:

    Best moment of yesterday’s pmqs was when Dave quoted David Miliband saying the coalition didn’t create youth unemployment. Ed looked like he could spit blood. Great stuff.

    Like

  26. 49
    Opens January 6 says:

    Posters for The Iron Lady have started going up at my local cinema. Grab the popcorn.

    Like

  27. 53
    I hate them now, I always will and when theyre dead, I'll hate them still says:

    There are no best moments in PMQs.
    Two 5th rate little rich boys playing politics…

    Like

  28. 55
    Anonymous says:

    zzzzzzzzzzzz

    Like

  29. 57
    Nick's finest moment (or only fine moment) says:

    Like

  30. 66
    Larry says:

    Like

  31. 68
    Not in Canterbury? says:

    Like

  32. 69
    Fracking Huhne. says:

    What can we do about chris Huhne? We are each being forced to spend hundreds of pounds to finance his ghastly solar panel scheme which will not keep one light burning on acold winter’s night?

    What vis the point of Dave capping Council tax and George the fuel tax while the Huhne is just pissing our money up the wall for a useless vanity project.

    Like

  33. 71
    Billy Bowden is the greatest umpire ever ! says:

    Like

  34. 72
    Gutten Morgan says:

    Piers morgan is in the crap. He’s got to attend the leveson inquisition.

    Like

  35. 77
    Lay Down your pens. says:

    How is the public sector going on strike a blow to the economy? It produces nothing and consumes all.

    The longer they strike the better and the less we have to pay them. Go for it brothers and sisters lay down your tools and take a month off. please.

    Like

  36. 80
    nell says:

    How has militwit managed to surround himself with this dodgy lot for his shadow cabinet. Is there no talent in the labour party?

    I can’t help thinking that his brother would have made a far better fist of things.

    Like

    • 82
      Mike Hunt says:

      Liebour voters get the representatives they deserve.

      Like

    • 85
      albacore says:

      Suspend your disbelief for a moment.
      Can you imagine the effect if Farage or some high-visibility, real Tory cut the cackle, quit playing at it and released a State of the Nation address to go viral?

      Like

      • 88
        nell says:

        Farage is impressive – his latest youtube from eu demonstrates that beyond doubt.

        But he lacks the electoral base in the uk. The only way I can see a proper tory party coming out of this mess at the moment is if we get a split, as we did with labour and sdp, and farage joins forces with those 80 rebels.

        Like

        • 92
          albacore says:

          They’ve all colluded to frustrate the wishes of the British people.
          Let the genie out of the bottle? No way.
          MI5 wet ops might not give a damn about Hancock; but they’d be after a real rebel before you could say “Jack Robinson”.

          Like

  37. 100
    Rootin' Tooting MP says:

    I got three stories, an’ I’m gonna stick to all of ‘em, yeah?

    Like

  38. 117
    Xavier Onassis says:

    Mustn’t criticise them, this behaviour is a ‘cultural’ thing, isn’t it?

    Like

  39. 118
    Ranter says:

    Send both of these fcukwits over to the US, a thousand years each in a bright orange jumpsuit is just what they need

    Like

  40. 122
    Strolling Bones says:

    “Khan has given no less than three conflicting accounts,…”

    Should be “…no FEWER…”, surely?

    Like

  41. 123
    Anonymous says:

    Get a life you prick

    Like


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Ralph Miliband on the English…

“The Englishman is a rabid nationalist. They are perhaps the most nationalist people in the world.”



Left on Left says:

The lefties are attacking because the panellist is a millionaire and lives in a London home worth upwards of two million. Someone had best tell them he’s called Ed Miliband.


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